Abstract

During the late 1900’s, Spain encountered a new spirit and sense of optimism, one phase of which was ushered in by Franco’s dictablanda. This new leniency allowed for more freedom in not only politics or social constructs, but also architecture. One very obvious example of this optimism in architecture is illustrated through Miguel Fisac’s bone architecture.

Miguel Fisac searched for innovative ways to create architectural and structural details. His bone-like structures varied in size depending on the building, but Fisac’s architecture always embodied a natural sense of structure, due to his continued use of hollow prestressed concrete. His groundbreaking developments regarding material and detail during the postwar period associate him with the modernization of Spanish architecture. This paper will argue that his work has done so by influencing work of architects to follow him such as MVRDV and Ensamble Studio.

In order to support this argument, drawings and writings of Fisac himself will be utilized as primary sources, whereas works published by others such as Javier Barrallo and Santiago Sánchez-Beitia and Sofia Balters will be used as secondary sources. These documents will illustrate the clear similarities between the work of Fisac and the work that followed him, proving that his work has influenced specific projects that fall into the category of modern Spanish architecture.

Modified Abstract

During the late 1900’s, Spain encountered a new spirit and sense of optimism, one phase of which was ushered in by Franco’s dictablanda. This new leniency allowed for more freedom in not only politics or social constructs, but also architecture. One very obvious example of this optimism in architecture is illustrated through Miguel Fisac’s bone architecture, which is known to have heavily influenced the modernization of Spanish Architecture. This paper will argue that his work has done so by influencing work of architects to follow him such as MVRDV and Ensamble Studio. Primary and secondary sources will be used to support this claim.

Research Category

Architecture

Author Information

Jessica SchultzFollow

Primary Author's Major

Architecture

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Tippey

Presentation Format

Poster

Roundtable Moderator

Dr. Tippey

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

Schultz.jpg (9781 kB)
Poster

Research Area

Architectural History and Criticism | Architecture

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Miguel Fisac's Direct Influence in Modern Spanish Architecture Through Concrete Innovation

During the late 1900’s, Spain encountered a new spirit and sense of optimism, one phase of which was ushered in by Franco’s dictablanda. This new leniency allowed for more freedom in not only politics or social constructs, but also architecture. One very obvious example of this optimism in architecture is illustrated through Miguel Fisac’s bone architecture.

Miguel Fisac searched for innovative ways to create architectural and structural details. His bone-like structures varied in size depending on the building, but Fisac’s architecture always embodied a natural sense of structure, due to his continued use of hollow prestressed concrete. His groundbreaking developments regarding material and detail during the postwar period associate him with the modernization of Spanish architecture. This paper will argue that his work has done so by influencing work of architects to follow him such as MVRDV and Ensamble Studio.

In order to support this argument, drawings and writings of Fisac himself will be utilized as primary sources, whereas works published by others such as Javier Barrallo and Santiago Sánchez-Beitia and Sofia Balters will be used as secondary sources. These documents will illustrate the clear similarities between the work of Fisac and the work that followed him, proving that his work has influenced specific projects that fall into the category of modern Spanish architecture.