Abstract

Numerous studies have been conducted to explain and understand the relationship between the navigational behavior of customers and layout of department stores to increase sales. One particular phenomenon discussed is route angularity effect, defined as: increasing the number of turns within a path also increases a person’s estimate of distance within that path. Through the interpretation of this data, the question arises, In what specific ways does the route angularity effect influence the navigational behavior of customers and their buying habits within a department store?” Observational research conducted at Universo Sport Duomo in Florence, Italy assists in the explanation of this inquiry.

The research was conducted over the course of 4 days; two specific customer’s navigational behavior patterns were observed and documented on a Universo Sport Duomo map during their entire department store visit. In addition, data for all customers entering the store, traveling through the store, and making a purchase were documented for a total of one hour each observational day. Of the people observed, two customers were selected for a personal interview about their experience.

Results identified customers felt the space was congested with no directional lighting and difficult wayfinding patterns. Of the 142 visiting customers, only 31 customers made a purchase. Overall, customers felt the store was long and divided, directly affecting interpretation of the store. Further research and study of the angularity effect is needed to provide a large data set to help establish a relationship between the customer and the layout of the store.

Modified Abstract

Numerous studies have been conducted on the route angularity effect to explain and understand the relationship between the navigational behavior of customers and layout of department stores to increase sales. The question then arises, In what specific ways does the route angularity effect influence the navigational behavior of customers and their buying habits within a department store?” Research was conducted over the course of 4 days over a one hour period. Results identified customers felt the space was congested and difficult way finding patterns. Overall, even though the data supported the implications the route angularity effect had within the department store, Universo Sport Duomo, further research is necessary to develop a better understanding of the relationship between the customer and the department store layout.

Research Category

Architecture

Author Information

Abigail DummermuthFollow

Primary Author's Major

Interior Design

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Pamela Evans

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Ji Young Cho

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 12:00 AM

Research Area

Architecture | Interior Architecture

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Mar 21st, 12:00 AM

How the Route Angularity Effect Influences Customer Behavior

Numerous studies have been conducted to explain and understand the relationship between the navigational behavior of customers and layout of department stores to increase sales. One particular phenomenon discussed is route angularity effect, defined as: increasing the number of turns within a path also increases a person’s estimate of distance within that path. Through the interpretation of this data, the question arises, In what specific ways does the route angularity effect influence the navigational behavior of customers and their buying habits within a department store?” Observational research conducted at Universo Sport Duomo in Florence, Italy assists in the explanation of this inquiry.

The research was conducted over the course of 4 days; two specific customer’s navigational behavior patterns were observed and documented on a Universo Sport Duomo map during their entire department store visit. In addition, data for all customers entering the store, traveling through the store, and making a purchase were documented for a total of one hour each observational day. Of the people observed, two customers were selected for a personal interview about their experience.

Results identified customers felt the space was congested with no directional lighting and difficult wayfinding patterns. Of the 142 visiting customers, only 31 customers made a purchase. Overall, customers felt the store was long and divided, directly affecting interpretation of the store. Further research and study of the angularity effect is needed to provide a large data set to help establish a relationship between the customer and the layout of the store.