Abstract

Problem: Studies have examined the effects and importance of family support in the lives of LGBT youth. It has been inferred that family support is a beneficial factor in the mental health of LGBT children, adolescents, and young adults. However, few studies have included social connectedness as an additional variable contributing to perceived family support and levels of depression within LGBT college students. Therefore, this study investigated the role of perceived family support and social connectedness on depression in LGBT university students.

Hypothesis: Respondents’ depression levels will differ contingent upon family support and social connectedness. In particular, it is expected that social connectedness will moderate the relationship between perceived family support and depression levels.

Methods: To date, participants include 78 LGBT students at Kent State University. The respondents who choose to select what best described their gender consisted of 40 females, 12 males, 8 transgender/gender queer, 2 transgender (female to male), and 7 identify as other. Participants completed the following surveys online: a demographic questionnaire, Perceived Social Support-Family (PSS-FA) Scale, Social Connectedness Scale-R (SCS-R), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) Scale. Distribution of the surveys online allowed for anonymity and the opportunity for participants to complete the surveys in any place of their choosing.

Results: Upon completion of data collection, regression analyses will be conducted to assess for moderating effects. The findings may have implications for reducing depression in LGBT college students who have little family support by promoting their sense of social connectedness.

Modified Abstract

Studies have examined the effects and importance of family support in the lives of LGBT youth. It has been inferred that family support is a beneficial factor in the mental health of LGBT children, adolescents, and young adults. However, few studies have included social connectedness as an additional variable contributing to perceived family support and levels of depression within LGBT college students. Therefore, this study investigated the role of perceived family support and social connectedness on depression in LGBT university students.

Participants completed the following surveys online: a demographic questionnaire, Perceived Social Support-Family (PSS-FA) Scale, Social Connectedness Scale-R (SCS-R), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) Scale.

It is hypothesized that respondents’ depression levels will differ contingent upon family support and social connectedness. In particular, it is expected that social connectedness will moderate the relationship between perceived family support and depression levels.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Maureen Blankemeyer

Presentation Format

Oral

Start Date

March 2016

Research Area

Other Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

The Role of Perceived Family Support and Social Connectedness on Depression in LGBT College Students

Problem: Studies have examined the effects and importance of family support in the lives of LGBT youth. It has been inferred that family support is a beneficial factor in the mental health of LGBT children, adolescents, and young adults. However, few studies have included social connectedness as an additional variable contributing to perceived family support and levels of depression within LGBT college students. Therefore, this study investigated the role of perceived family support and social connectedness on depression in LGBT university students.

Hypothesis: Respondents’ depression levels will differ contingent upon family support and social connectedness. In particular, it is expected that social connectedness will moderate the relationship between perceived family support and depression levels.

Methods: To date, participants include 78 LGBT students at Kent State University. The respondents who choose to select what best described their gender consisted of 40 females, 12 males, 8 transgender/gender queer, 2 transgender (female to male), and 7 identify as other. Participants completed the following surveys online: a demographic questionnaire, Perceived Social Support-Family (PSS-FA) Scale, Social Connectedness Scale-R (SCS-R), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) Scale. Distribution of the surveys online allowed for anonymity and the opportunity for participants to complete the surveys in any place of their choosing.

Results: Upon completion of data collection, regression analyses will be conducted to assess for moderating effects. The findings may have implications for reducing depression in LGBT college students who have little family support by promoting their sense of social connectedness.