Abstract

Familism is a core Latino value hypothesized to influence behavior and adjustment across multiple domains among adolescents. Various operationalizations of familism exist and measures of attitudinal familism have been confounded with the quality of family relations. In addition, the association between attitudinal familism and psychological distress among adolescent Latina mothers has not been previously studied. The goals of the current study were to test the validity of a relatively new measure of attitudinal familism among Latina adolescent mothers, and examine its relations to parenting orientation and psychological distress.

170 adolescent Latina mothers were recruited from a large, midwestern city. Mothers’ mean age was 19.50 years (SD= 1.35). Mothers completed self-reports of attitudinal familism (Lugo & Contreras, 2003); acculturation (Cortes et al, 1994); parenting orientation (Mylod et al., 1997); psychological distress (depression & anxiety SCL-90R); parenting competence (PSI, Abidin, 1990); economic strain (Pearlin et al., 1981); and life stress (Sarason et al., 1979).

Mothers with greater familistic beliefs were found to consider having children and parenting of higher importance in their lives (ΔR2 = .04, p = .002), after controlling for perceptions of parenting competence and Latino cultural orientation. Mothers’ familistic beliefs were not significantly associated with psychological distress, after controlling for maternal age, life event stress, and economic strain. Thus, greater attitudinal familism is associated with a more positive orientation toward parenting, but not with lower psychological distress.

Modified Abstract

Familism is a core Latino value hypothesized to influence behavior and adjustment across multiple domains among adolescents. However, attitudinal familism has been operationalized in various ways and no studies have examined its associations with psychological distress in adolescent Latina mothers. The goals of the current study were to test the validity of a relatively new measure of attitudinal familism among Latina adolescent mothers, and examine its relations to parenting orientation and psychological distress. 170 adolescent Latina mothers completed self-reports of attitudinal familism, psychological distress, parenting orientation, acculturation, parenting competence, economic strain, and life stress. Mothers with greater familistic beliefs were associated with considering having children and parenting of higher importance in their lives. Mothers’ attitudinal familism was not significantly associated with psychological distress.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Ms. Lauren Wood

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Josefina M. Grau

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

poster references.docx (13 kB)
List of references for the submitted abstract.

Research Area

Multicultural Psychology

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Attitudinal Familism predicts Parenting Orientation in Adolescent Latina Mothers

Familism is a core Latino value hypothesized to influence behavior and adjustment across multiple domains among adolescents. Various operationalizations of familism exist and measures of attitudinal familism have been confounded with the quality of family relations. In addition, the association between attitudinal familism and psychological distress among adolescent Latina mothers has not been previously studied. The goals of the current study were to test the validity of a relatively new measure of attitudinal familism among Latina adolescent mothers, and examine its relations to parenting orientation and psychological distress.

170 adolescent Latina mothers were recruited from a large, midwestern city. Mothers’ mean age was 19.50 years (SD= 1.35). Mothers completed self-reports of attitudinal familism (Lugo & Contreras, 2003); acculturation (Cortes et al, 1994); parenting orientation (Mylod et al., 1997); psychological distress (depression & anxiety SCL-90R); parenting competence (PSI, Abidin, 1990); economic strain (Pearlin et al., 1981); and life stress (Sarason et al., 1979).

Mothers with greater familistic beliefs were found to consider having children and parenting of higher importance in their lives (ΔR2 = .04, p = .002), after controlling for perceptions of parenting competence and Latino cultural orientation. Mothers’ familistic beliefs were not significantly associated with psychological distress, after controlling for maternal age, life event stress, and economic strain. Thus, greater attitudinal familism is associated with a more positive orientation toward parenting, but not with lower psychological distress.