Abstract Title

Individual Differences in Phonological Processing and Reading Comprehension

Abstract

During silent reading, readers take longer to read sentences with repeated word-initial phonemes (Twenty toys were in the trunk) compared to matched sentences with unrepeated phonemes (Several games were in the chest) (McCutch & Perfetti, 1982). In a recent poster, Taylor, Eskenazi, and Folk (2015) found evidence that readers with high working memory do not show as much disruption as readers with lower working memory. This provided evidence that both sound codes and working memory is involved in word identification during silent reading. In the current follow-up experiment we used eye-tracking to determine whether the disruption occurs early or late in sentence reading and whether this slower reading is also related to comprehension difficulty. Participants read 21 sentences split into three conditions: six repeated phonemes, three repeated phonemes, and zero repeated phonemes. Participants’ eye movements were monitored using an EyeLink 1000 Plus eye-tracker. Participants answered comprehension questions after each sentence then completed a reading span task to measure working memory. We found that reading times slowed with each additional repeated phoneme, which indicates that sound codes are used in identifying words. We also found greater disruption in reading comprehension in sentences with more repeated phonemes. This experiment provides further evidence that sound codes are used to identify words during silent reading, and that sound codes are also used in comprehending the meaning of sentences.

Modified Abstract

During silent reading, readers take longer to read sentences with repeated word-initial phonemes compared to matched sentences with unrepeated phonemes (McCutch & Perfetti, 1982). In a recent poster, Taylor, Eskenazi, and Folk (2015) found evidence that readers with high working memory experience less disruption then readers with lower working memory. This provided evidence that both sound codes and working memory are involved in word identification. In the follow-up we wanted to determine whether the disruption occurs early or late in sentence reading and whether this slower reading is also related to comprehension difficulty. The results of this experiment suggests that sound codes are used to identify words during silent reading, and that sound codes are also used in comprehending the meaning of sentences.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Michael Eskenazi

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Jocelyn Folk

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

Biographical Sketch.docx (54 kB)
Biographical Sketch with Head shot

Research Area

Cognitive Psychology

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Individual Differences in Phonological Processing and Reading Comprehension

During silent reading, readers take longer to read sentences with repeated word-initial phonemes (Twenty toys were in the trunk) compared to matched sentences with unrepeated phonemes (Several games were in the chest) (McCutch & Perfetti, 1982). In a recent poster, Taylor, Eskenazi, and Folk (2015) found evidence that readers with high working memory do not show as much disruption as readers with lower working memory. This provided evidence that both sound codes and working memory is involved in word identification during silent reading. In the current follow-up experiment we used eye-tracking to determine whether the disruption occurs early or late in sentence reading and whether this slower reading is also related to comprehension difficulty. Participants read 21 sentences split into three conditions: six repeated phonemes, three repeated phonemes, and zero repeated phonemes. Participants’ eye movements were monitored using an EyeLink 1000 Plus eye-tracker. Participants answered comprehension questions after each sentence then completed a reading span task to measure working memory. We found that reading times slowed with each additional repeated phoneme, which indicates that sound codes are used in identifying words. We also found greater disruption in reading comprehension in sentences with more repeated phonemes. This experiment provides further evidence that sound codes are used to identify words during silent reading, and that sound codes are also used in comprehending the meaning of sentences.