Abstract

Social support is an important factor related to the development of and buffering against mental health in LGB youth and young adults. Support from family and friends allows LGB youth to feel confident in their beliefs and behaviors. This type of support can drastically reduce mental health issues that LGB youth may experience. We explore the relationship between source of social support and mental health in a sample of previously traumatized, low SES, racial minority LGB adolescents and young adults and investigate age as a possible moderator of the relationship between source of social support and mental health outcomes. Results: Social support from family (β= -.302p= .03; β= -.364, p= .008), but not friends or significant others was significantly predictive of PTSD and depression symptoms. Age x support source interactions revealed that family social support was associated with significantly lower PTSD and depression symptoms when participants were between the ages of 16 and 19 whereas friend social support was associated with significantly lower PTSD and depression symptoms for participants in their early twenties. In order to best treat mental health issues in LGB adolescents and young adults, the age of the individual and social support from family and friend should be taken into consideration. Difference sources of social support are critical during certain developmental periods for LGB youth.

Modified Abstract

Social support is an important factor related to the development of and buffering against mental health in LGB youth and young adults. Support from family and friends allows LGB youth to feel confident in their beliefs and behaviors. This type of support can drastically reduce mental health issues that LGB youth may experience. We explore the relationship between source of social support and mental health in a sample of previously traumatized, low SES, racial minority LGB adolescents and young adults and investigate age as a possible moderator of the relationship between source of social support and mental health outcomes.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Ms. Anna Wise

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Douglas Delahanty

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

The Developmental Impact of Social Support Source on Mental Health in LGB Youth

Social support is an important factor related to the development of and buffering against mental health in LGB youth and young adults. Support from family and friends allows LGB youth to feel confident in their beliefs and behaviors. This type of support can drastically reduce mental health issues that LGB youth may experience. We explore the relationship between source of social support and mental health in a sample of previously traumatized, low SES, racial minority LGB adolescents and young adults and investigate age as a possible moderator of the relationship between source of social support and mental health outcomes. Results: Social support from family (β= -.302p= .03; β= -.364, p= .008), but not friends or significant others was significantly predictive of PTSD and depression symptoms. Age x support source interactions revealed that family social support was associated with significantly lower PTSD and depression symptoms when participants were between the ages of 16 and 19 whereas friend social support was associated with significantly lower PTSD and depression symptoms for participants in their early twenties. In order to best treat mental health issues in LGB adolescents and young adults, the age of the individual and social support from family and friend should be taken into consideration. Difference sources of social support are critical during certain developmental periods for LGB youth.