Abstract Title

The Sequential Release of Drugs using Injectable and Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites

Abstract

Keywords: Hydrogels, Pluronic F127, drug release, florescence TR-BSA

Problem: Many of currently available methods of delivering a single factor have demonstrated a limited efficacy in stimulating tissue repair. This has been associated with the complexity of tissue healing process. Therefore, it is critical that multiple therapeutic factors should be delivered to act in concert with the normal process of tissue healing, which may provide physiologically relevant release profiles that mimic the natural healing response. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of achieving the controlled release of drugs in a sequential fashion by developing composite of biodegradable hydrogels consisting of F-127 hydrogel and gelatin microspheres.

Methods: Two forms of hydrogels, Pluronic F127 and gelatin microspheres, were prepared separately by mixing them with a model drug (Texas Red bovine serum albumin, TR-BSA) and the prepared hydrogels were incubated at 37oC over days. At selected time points, supernatants were collected to quantify the extent of drug release from the gels based on the intensity of the florescence from TR-BSA.

Results and Conclusion: Our data supports that the sequential delivery system can enable the release of TR-BSA loaded with F-127 gel over ~8hr and gradual release of TR-BSA loaded within gelatin microsphere over duration of days. This study implicates that a sequential release of two different drugs can be achieved by triggering an initial release of one drug from F-127 gel followed by slow release of another drug from gelatin microspheres.

Modified Abstract

Many of currently available methods of delivering a single factor have demonstrated a limited efficacy in stimulating tissue repair. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate controlled release of drugs in a sequential fashion by developing composite of biodegradable hydrogels consisting of F-127 hydrogel and gelatin microspheres. Two forms of hydrogels were prepared, mixed with a model drug and the hydrogels were incubated. The supernatants were collected to quantify the extent of drug release from the gels based on the florescence intensity of the model drug. Our data supports the release of TR-BSA loaded with F-127 gel occurs over ~8hr and gradual release of TR-BSA loaded within gelatin microsphere over a duration of days. This study implicates that a release of two different drugs can be achieved by triggering an initial release of one drug from F-127 gel followed by slow release of another drug from gelatin microspheres.

Research Category

Biomedical Sciences

Author Information

Caleb J. ClarkFollow

Primary Author's Major

Biology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Min-Ho Kim

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

bio sketch.docx (39 kB)

Research Area

Other Chemicals and Drugs | Other Medical Sciences

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

The Sequential Release of Drugs using Injectable and Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites

Keywords: Hydrogels, Pluronic F127, drug release, florescence TR-BSA

Problem: Many of currently available methods of delivering a single factor have demonstrated a limited efficacy in stimulating tissue repair. This has been associated with the complexity of tissue healing process. Therefore, it is critical that multiple therapeutic factors should be delivered to act in concert with the normal process of tissue healing, which may provide physiologically relevant release profiles that mimic the natural healing response. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of achieving the controlled release of drugs in a sequential fashion by developing composite of biodegradable hydrogels consisting of F-127 hydrogel and gelatin microspheres.

Methods: Two forms of hydrogels, Pluronic F127 and gelatin microspheres, were prepared separately by mixing them with a model drug (Texas Red bovine serum albumin, TR-BSA) and the prepared hydrogels were incubated at 37oC over days. At selected time points, supernatants were collected to quantify the extent of drug release from the gels based on the intensity of the florescence from TR-BSA.

Results and Conclusion: Our data supports that the sequential delivery system can enable the release of TR-BSA loaded with F-127 gel over ~8hr and gradual release of TR-BSA loaded within gelatin microsphere over duration of days. This study implicates that a sequential release of two different drugs can be achieved by triggering an initial release of one drug from F-127 gel followed by slow release of another drug from gelatin microspheres.