Abstract Title

Creativity: A Survey of Popular Misconceptions

Abstract

Creativity is a sub-field of cognitive psychology with a long history of empirical study. Some of the results of these investigations are at odds with popularly held beliefs about creativity, especially in the general population. This study was designed to gather information about the types of misconceptions people generally endorse, the rates at which misconceptions are held, and to determine if certain demographic or personality variables are related to knowledge of creativity.

We used a short survey to examine this topic. We collected demographic and personality information, and also asked participants to rate their own creativity. In addition, we asked participants an open-ended question—to provide their own definition of creativity. We then asked participants to rate a series of statements regarding creativity as true or false.

This research is ongoing, but we expect to see several misconceptions frequently marked as true, and will provide breakdowns of these results by age, gender, personality, and major.

Modified Abstract

We present the results of a short survey that was designed to gather information about the types of misconceptions people generally endorse regarding creativity, the rates at which misconceptions are held, and to determine if certain demographic or personality variables are related to knowledge of creativity.

Research Category

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Rachael Blasiman

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

Research Area

Cognitive Psychology

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Creativity: A Survey of Popular Misconceptions

Creativity is a sub-field of cognitive psychology with a long history of empirical study. Some of the results of these investigations are at odds with popularly held beliefs about creativity, especially in the general population. This study was designed to gather information about the types of misconceptions people generally endorse, the rates at which misconceptions are held, and to determine if certain demographic or personality variables are related to knowledge of creativity.

We used a short survey to examine this topic. We collected demographic and personality information, and also asked participants to rate their own creativity. In addition, we asked participants an open-ended question—to provide their own definition of creativity. We then asked participants to rate a series of statements regarding creativity as true or false.

This research is ongoing, but we expect to see several misconceptions frequently marked as true, and will provide breakdowns of these results by age, gender, personality, and major.