Abstract

Protein-protein interactions play a key role during each stage of the viral life cycle. Thus, inhibiting viral protein-protein interactions with the peptides derived from the binding interfaces is a promising approach for potential multi-epitope based treatments. However, molecular mechanisms underlying these protein interactions are not yet fully understood. This study is focused on a comprehensive literature survey to identify known peptide inhibitors derived from the HIV-1 viral proteins, which disrupt viral-viral protein interactions. We also discuss the limitations of these studies in identifying the most promising candidates. The candidate domains/regions identified in this survey will be used in the future bioinformatics analyses that examine patterns of coevolution between binding partners, specifically, in the attempt to differentiate between direct and indirect interactors (in other words, physical and functional interactions) using a coevolutionary approach (Hetti Arachchilage and Piontkivska 2016).

Modified Abstract

Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in viral growth and reproduction. Binding site derived peptide inhibition of viral protein-protein interactions offers a promising avenue for development of new viral treatments. This study will identify promising peptide inhibitors in HIV-1 via a literature survey and review, information that will be utilized in future bioinformatic analyses that attempt to differentiate between direct and indirect interactors through coevoultionary comparisons.

Research Category

Biomedical Sciences

Primary Author's Major

Biology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Helen Piontkivska

Mentor #2 Information

Madara Hetti Arachchilage

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

Research Area

Cell Biology | Molecular Genetics

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Peptide inhibitors that disrupt viral-viral protein interactions in HIV-1: literature-based review

Protein-protein interactions play a key role during each stage of the viral life cycle. Thus, inhibiting viral protein-protein interactions with the peptides derived from the binding interfaces is a promising approach for potential multi-epitope based treatments. However, molecular mechanisms underlying these protein interactions are not yet fully understood. This study is focused on a comprehensive literature survey to identify known peptide inhibitors derived from the HIV-1 viral proteins, which disrupt viral-viral protein interactions. We also discuss the limitations of these studies in identifying the most promising candidates. The candidate domains/regions identified in this survey will be used in the future bioinformatics analyses that examine patterns of coevolution between binding partners, specifically, in the attempt to differentiate between direct and indirect interactors (in other words, physical and functional interactions) using a coevolutionary approach (Hetti Arachchilage and Piontkivska 2016).