Abstract Title

Cost Analysis for Lightweight Aggregates Made from Dredged Material in the Lab

Abstract

Creating an environmentally responsible application for dredge material is a needed step toward a sustainable future. In order to combat potential sustainability issues in Lake Erie caused by large quantities of dredged material from the Cuyahoga River and Harbor of Cleveland, lightweight aggregates have been successfully manufactured in the lab and implemented in green roof soil. This research analyzes the cost of transportation, electricity, and labor in manufacturing the lightweight aggregates in the lab, and further investigates alternative production methods. The transportation analysis uses statistics from personal and commercial vehicles as well as from the US Departments of Energy and Labor Statistics to compare the total cost of raw material transportation methods. Furthermore, it looks into the cost and benefits of outsourcing transportation. The electrical cost analysis uses data from various electrical providers and equipment manufacturers to estimate current costs and potential savings though alternative production methods. The analysis of labor costs references personal experience during the study. It reveals that labor is responsible for 95% of production costs. Labor costs can be reduced with the introduction of specialized equipment, creating savings that negate the increased costs found in electrical analysis. Ultimately, the final product is most efficiently fabricated with factory mass production, but can be substantially improved by replacing labor with small scale specialized equipment.

Modified Abstract

Creating an environmentally responsible application for dredge material is a needed step toward a sustainable future. In order to combat potential sustainability issues in Lake Erie caused by large quantities of dredged material from the Cuyahoga River and Harbor of Cleveland, lightweight aggregates have been successfully manufactured in the lab and implemented in green roof soil. This research analyzes the cost of transportation, electricity, and labor in manufacturing the lightweight aggregates in the lab, and further investigates alternative production methods. The study reveals that labor is responsible for 95% of production costs and can be substantially reduced by replacing labor with small scale specialized equipment.

Research Category

Architecture

Primary Author's Major

Architecture

Mentor #1 Information

Rui Liu

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

15-3-2016 1:00 PM

Research Area

Architecture

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Cost Analysis for Lightweight Aggregates Made from Dredged Material in the Lab

Creating an environmentally responsible application for dredge material is a needed step toward a sustainable future. In order to combat potential sustainability issues in Lake Erie caused by large quantities of dredged material from the Cuyahoga River and Harbor of Cleveland, lightweight aggregates have been successfully manufactured in the lab and implemented in green roof soil. This research analyzes the cost of transportation, electricity, and labor in manufacturing the lightweight aggregates in the lab, and further investigates alternative production methods. The transportation analysis uses statistics from personal and commercial vehicles as well as from the US Departments of Energy and Labor Statistics to compare the total cost of raw material transportation methods. Furthermore, it looks into the cost and benefits of outsourcing transportation. The electrical cost analysis uses data from various electrical providers and equipment manufacturers to estimate current costs and potential savings though alternative production methods. The analysis of labor costs references personal experience during the study. It reveals that labor is responsible for 95% of production costs. Labor costs can be reduced with the introduction of specialized equipment, creating savings that negate the increased costs found in electrical analysis. Ultimately, the final product is most efficiently fabricated with factory mass production, but can be substantially improved by replacing labor with small scale specialized equipment.