Abstract Title

Study of Transformation through Polish Heritage and Folklore

Abstract

Primary Author- Hunter Custer Kent State University-Main Campus

Primary Author’s Major- Fashion Design

Advisor- Kendra Lapolla- Assistant Professor, Fashion Design

A full clothing collection was created as an in depth research response to transformation. In Polish Folklore, transformation in one myth in particular the Rusalka. A Rusalka, is a when a woman who dies of a traumatic or unnatural death by drowning. The woman then turns into a water spirit who haunts that body of water. This myth was chosen to explore the transformation of physical form to non physical form. Researching the ancient myth included reading about ancient pagan Gods, Godesses and creatures. Information was found through online articles, websites and books found at the Kent State University Library. Methods through design were practiced as well. This involves draping on a form, preliminary sketches and muslins. The conclusion was reached through an investigation of a transformable eveningwear collection. Garments could be manipulated by the wearer transforming into multi purpose garments. 3D printed pins and buckles were created inspired by Polish embroidery and openwork. These were placed on garments where hand embroidery was intentionally placed as to tell the wearer how the garment transforms.

Modified Abstract

Primary Author- Hunter Custer Kent State University-Main Campus

Primary Author’s Major- Fashion Design

Advisor- Kendra Lapolla- Assistant Professor, Fashion Design

A full clothing collection was created as an in depth research response to transformation. In Polish Folklore, transformation in one myth in particular the Rusalka. This myth was chosen to explore transformation of physical to non physical form. Information was found through online articles, websites and books found at the Kent State University Library. Methods through design were practiced as well. This involves draping on a form, preliminary sketches and muslins. The conclusion was reached through an investigation of a transformable eveningwear collection. Garments could be manipulated by the wearer transforming into multi purpose garments. 3D printed pins, buckles were created inspired by Polish embroidery and openwork. These were placed on garments where hand embroidery was intentionally placed telling the wearer how the garment transforms.

Research Category

Art/Fashion

Author Information

hunter custerFollow

Primary Author's Major

Fashion Design

Mentor #1 Information

Kendra Lapolla

Start Date

March 2016

Research Area

Arts and Humanities | European History | Fine Arts | History of Religion | Oral History | Other Arts and Humanities | Other History | Slavic Languages and Societies | Women's History

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Study of Transformation through Polish Heritage and Folklore

Primary Author- Hunter Custer Kent State University-Main Campus

Primary Author’s Major- Fashion Design

Advisor- Kendra Lapolla- Assistant Professor, Fashion Design

A full clothing collection was created as an in depth research response to transformation. In Polish Folklore, transformation in one myth in particular the Rusalka. A Rusalka, is a when a woman who dies of a traumatic or unnatural death by drowning. The woman then turns into a water spirit who haunts that body of water. This myth was chosen to explore the transformation of physical form to non physical form. Researching the ancient myth included reading about ancient pagan Gods, Godesses and creatures. Information was found through online articles, websites and books found at the Kent State University Library. Methods through design were practiced as well. This involves draping on a form, preliminary sketches and muslins. The conclusion was reached through an investigation of a transformable eveningwear collection. Garments could be manipulated by the wearer transforming into multi purpose garments. 3D printed pins and buckles were created inspired by Polish embroidery and openwork. These were placed on garments where hand embroidery was intentionally placed as to tell the wearer how the garment transforms.