Abstract Title

Next-generation sequencing datasets as a tool to study evolutionary patterns in HIV-1 genomes

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) remains an important public health challenge worldwide, with numerous vaccine and drug development efforts being underway. Being able to accurately estimate the rate of evolutionary changes in various regions of the viral genomes, including viral epitopes, is an important aspect of the vaccine development. In this study we will review publicly available high-throughput sequencing datasets (derived through the so-called next-generation sequencing technologies that encompass Roche 454, Illumina and other approaches) and their utility to estimate the rates of sequence changes in viral epitopes.

Modified Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) remains an important public health challenge worldwide, with numerous vaccine and drug development efforts being underway. Being able to accurately estimate the rate of evolutionary changes in various regions of the viral genomes, including viral epitopes, is an important aspect of the vaccine development. In this study we will review publicly available high-throughput sequencing datasets (derived through the so-called next-generation sequencing technologies that encompass Roche 454, Illumina and other approaches) and their utility to estimate the rates of sequence changes in viral epitopes.

Research Category

Biomedical Sciences

Primary Author's Major

Biotechnology

Mentor #1 Information

Madara Hetti Archchilage

Mentor #2 Information

Reeba Paul

Mentor #3 Information

Helen Piontkivska

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

Research Area

Bioinformatics | Virus Diseases | Viruses

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Next-generation sequencing datasets as a tool to study evolutionary patterns in HIV-1 genomes

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) remains an important public health challenge worldwide, with numerous vaccine and drug development efforts being underway. Being able to accurately estimate the rate of evolutionary changes in various regions of the viral genomes, including viral epitopes, is an important aspect of the vaccine development. In this study we will review publicly available high-throughput sequencing datasets (derived through the so-called next-generation sequencing technologies that encompass Roche 454, Illumina and other approaches) and their utility to estimate the rates of sequence changes in viral epitopes.