Abstract Title

Initial Validation of a Questionnaire to Assess Portion Size Knowledge

Abstract

Obesity is an ongoing health concern in the United States. Overeating is one of the many factors contributing to the obesity epidemic. There are several approaches to assisting people in controlling food intake. One is to provide education on correct portion sizes, another is to provide pre-packaged portions of the correct sizes, and a third is to use portion-control dishware to encourage selection of correct portion sizes. Preliminary to conducting a study comparing the effectiveness of portion size training with portion control plates, we needed to create a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of correct portion sizes for a meal. Specifically, standard portion recommendations are 3 ounces of protein, ½ cup of grains or starches, and 1 cup of fruit or vegetables. We created a 12-item questionnaire administered to 64 participants (32 men) before and after portion size training. Participants also completed the measure when they returned 2 days later to attempt to plate correct food portions. Analyses of internal consistency and retest reliability (r = .78) showed that the questionnaire had acceptable psychometric properties. Changes in knowledge in the trained group from 3.6 (SD = 1.8) to 8.3 (SD = 2.5) showed that the measure was sensitive to training effects (p < .05). Future research should refine the measure in accordance with the newly released 2015 USDA guidelines.

Modified Abstract

Obesity is an ongoing health concern in the United States. Overeating is one factor contributing to the obesity epidemic. There are several approaches to assisting people in controlling food intake. One is to provide education on correct portion sizes, another is to provide pre-packaged portions of the correct sizes, and a third is to use portion-control dishware to encourage selection of correct portion sizes. Preliminary to conducting a study comparing the effectiveness of portion size training with portion control plates, we needed to create a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of correct portion sizes for a meal. We created a 12-item questionnaire administered at different time points. Analyses of internal consistency and retest reliability showed that the questionnaire had acceptable psychometric properties. Future research should refine the measure in accordance with the newly released 2015 USDA guidelines.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Joel Hughes

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

Research Area

Health Psychology

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Initial Validation of a Questionnaire to Assess Portion Size Knowledge

Obesity is an ongoing health concern in the United States. Overeating is one of the many factors contributing to the obesity epidemic. There are several approaches to assisting people in controlling food intake. One is to provide education on correct portion sizes, another is to provide pre-packaged portions of the correct sizes, and a third is to use portion-control dishware to encourage selection of correct portion sizes. Preliminary to conducting a study comparing the effectiveness of portion size training with portion control plates, we needed to create a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of correct portion sizes for a meal. Specifically, standard portion recommendations are 3 ounces of protein, ½ cup of grains or starches, and 1 cup of fruit or vegetables. We created a 12-item questionnaire administered to 64 participants (32 men) before and after portion size training. Participants also completed the measure when they returned 2 days later to attempt to plate correct food portions. Analyses of internal consistency and retest reliability (r = .78) showed that the questionnaire had acceptable psychometric properties. Changes in knowledge in the trained group from 3.6 (SD = 1.8) to 8.3 (SD = 2.5) showed that the measure was sensitive to training effects (p < .05). Future research should refine the measure in accordance with the newly released 2015 USDA guidelines.