Abstract Title

Age Predicts Grief Symptoms in a Sample of Bereaved Siblings

Abstract

Research has shown that children who have lost a sibling need continuous support and grief therapy in order to reduce the likelihood of negative mental health outcomes. The results from past research specifically focus on grief, and largely neglect other sequela (i.e. depression and PTSD), in children from the loss of a loved one. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate whether receiving mental health treatment after a sibling death predicted sibling depression, post-traumatic stress, or grief symptoms in children and young adults ages 7-22. Results showed that the proposed model represented the data well, c2 (3) = 9.273, p<.05. Individuals that received mental health treatment were less likely to have symptoms of grief compared to those that did not receive mental health treatment after a sibling death (B= .18, p=.01). The odds of receiving mental health treatment increased by a factor of 1.18 (18%) with every one-point increase in grief symptoms. Post-traumatic stress and depression symptoms were not significantly associated with receiving mental health treatment. Results indicate that mental health services after the death of a sibling should be broader to reduce symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress along with grief symptoms. Broadening the practices of mental health treatments could reduce the depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms that bereaved children experience.

Modified Abstract

Results from past research specifically focus on grief, and largely neglect other sequela (i.e. depression and PTSD), in children from the loss of a loved one. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate whether receiving mental health treatment after a sibling death predicted sibling depression, post-traumatic stress, or grief symptoms. Individuals that received mental health treatment were less likely to have symptoms of grief compared to those that did not receive mental health treatment after a sibling death (B= .18, p=.01). Post-traumatic stress and depression symptoms were not significantly associated with receiving mental health treatment. Results indicate that mental health services after the death of a sibling should be broader to reduce symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress along with grief symptoms.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Human Development & Family Studies/Family Life Education

Mentor #1 Information

Ms. Anna Wise

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Douglas Delahanty

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

Research Area

Clinical Psychology

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Age Predicts Grief Symptoms in a Sample of Bereaved Siblings

Research has shown that children who have lost a sibling need continuous support and grief therapy in order to reduce the likelihood of negative mental health outcomes. The results from past research specifically focus on grief, and largely neglect other sequela (i.e. depression and PTSD), in children from the loss of a loved one. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate whether receiving mental health treatment after a sibling death predicted sibling depression, post-traumatic stress, or grief symptoms in children and young adults ages 7-22. Results showed that the proposed model represented the data well, c2 (3) = 9.273, p<.05. Individuals that received mental health treatment were less likely to have symptoms of grief compared to those that did not receive mental health treatment after a sibling death (B= .18, p=.01). The odds of receiving mental health treatment increased by a factor of 1.18 (18%) with every one-point increase in grief symptoms. Post-traumatic stress and depression symptoms were not significantly associated with receiving mental health treatment. Results indicate that mental health services after the death of a sibling should be broader to reduce symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress along with grief symptoms. Broadening the practices of mental health treatments could reduce the depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms that bereaved children experience.