Abstract Title

Perceptions of Appearance

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of women based on appearance and college major. A survey was created that presented participants with one of two images along with one of three captions (six conditions). The same woman was pictured in both images, identically dressed except for shoes and bag. In Image 1, she wore sneakers and carried a backpack; in Image 2 she wore high heels and carried a fashionable tote. Accompanying one of the images was one of the following three descriptors: “College Student at a Large University,” “Fashion Major at a Large University,” and “Women’s Studies Major at a Large University.” When randomly presented with a photo and caption, participants indicated level of agreement for 25 characteristics/attributes on a seven-point scale. Characteristics/attributes were based on Johnson, Crutsinger, and Workman’s study, “Can Professional Women Appear Too Masculine? The Case of the Necktie.” (1994), which examined perceptions of women’s dress and managerial qualities. Four hundred and fifty-six college students answered the online survey. Results showed that the choice of clothing as well as college major influenced how participants viewed this abstract individual’s characteristics/attributes both positively and negatively. This research indicates that women are judged by their appearance, their choice of apparel, and their education related interests.

Modified Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of women based on appearance and college major. A survey was created that presented participants with one of two images along with one of three captions. The same woman was pictured in both images, identically dressed except for shoes and bag. In Image 1, she wore sneakers and carried a backpack; in Image 2 she wore high heels and carried a fashionable tote. Accompanying one of the images was one of the following three descriptors: “College Student at a Large University,” “Fashion Major at a Large University,” and “Women’s Studies Major at a Large University.” When randomly presented with a photo and caption, participants indicated level of agreement for 25 characteristics/attributes on a seven-point scale.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Author Information

Stephanie M. LedonneFollow

Primary Author's Major

Fashion Merchandisinig

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Catherine Leslie

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

March 2016

LeDonne_Bio.docx (10 kB)
Bio

453-1.jpg (7598 kB)

Research Area

Arts and Humanities | Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Perceptions of Appearance

The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of women based on appearance and college major. A survey was created that presented participants with one of two images along with one of three captions (six conditions). The same woman was pictured in both images, identically dressed except for shoes and bag. In Image 1, she wore sneakers and carried a backpack; in Image 2 she wore high heels and carried a fashionable tote. Accompanying one of the images was one of the following three descriptors: “College Student at a Large University,” “Fashion Major at a Large University,” and “Women’s Studies Major at a Large University.” When randomly presented with a photo and caption, participants indicated level of agreement for 25 characteristics/attributes on a seven-point scale. Characteristics/attributes were based on Johnson, Crutsinger, and Workman’s study, “Can Professional Women Appear Too Masculine? The Case of the Necktie.” (1994), which examined perceptions of women’s dress and managerial qualities. Four hundred and fifty-six college students answered the online survey. Results showed that the choice of clothing as well as college major influenced how participants viewed this abstract individual’s characteristics/attributes both positively and negatively. This research indicates that women are judged by their appearance, their choice of apparel, and their education related interests.