Abstract Title

Acute free-weight resistance exercise alters aortic wave reflection but not pulse wave velocity in resistance-trained individuals.

Abstract

PROBLEM: Evaluation of arterial stiffness and pulse wave reflection provide insight into vascular function more so than traditional measures such as brachial blood pressure. METHODS: Thirteen young, healthy individuals (mean±SD; Aged 23±3 yrs; Ht: 1.74±0.06m; Wt: 79.7±10.8kg; percent body fat: 15.6±7.1%) with 9±3 yrs of lifting experience volunteered for the study. Maximal strength using the 1-repetition maximum (1RM) was assessed on the squat (140±34kg), bench press (101±35kg) and the deadlift (154±43kg). Participants performed 2 randomized sessions consisting of a quiet control or an acute bout of resistance exercise using free-weights. The acute bout of resistance exercise consisted of 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% 1RM for the squat, bench press and deadlift with 2 minutes of rest between sets and exercises. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and wave reflection were collected at rest and 10 minutes after each session. RESULTS: There was no significant (p>0.05) interaction for cfPWV. There was a significant interaction for the augmentation index (AIx; rest: 112.6±4.6%, recovery: 120.7±4.5%, p0.05) for brachial blood pressure. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that an acute bout of resistance exercise significantly alters aortic wave reflection characteristics but not aortic pulse wave velocity or brachial blood pressure.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Exercise Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. J. Derek Kingsley

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

11-3-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

11-3-2015 5:00 PM

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Research Area

Exercise Science

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Mar 11th, 1:00 PM Mar 11th, 5:00 PM

Acute free-weight resistance exercise alters aortic wave reflection but not pulse wave velocity in resistance-trained individuals.

PROBLEM: Evaluation of arterial stiffness and pulse wave reflection provide insight into vascular function more so than traditional measures such as brachial blood pressure. METHODS: Thirteen young, healthy individuals (mean±SD; Aged 23±3 yrs; Ht: 1.74±0.06m; Wt: 79.7±10.8kg; percent body fat: 15.6±7.1%) with 9±3 yrs of lifting experience volunteered for the study. Maximal strength using the 1-repetition maximum (1RM) was assessed on the squat (140±34kg), bench press (101±35kg) and the deadlift (154±43kg). Participants performed 2 randomized sessions consisting of a quiet control or an acute bout of resistance exercise using free-weights. The acute bout of resistance exercise consisted of 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% 1RM for the squat, bench press and deadlift with 2 minutes of rest between sets and exercises. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and wave reflection were collected at rest and 10 minutes after each session. RESULTS: There was no significant (p>0.05) interaction for cfPWV. There was a significant interaction for the augmentation index (AIx; rest: 112.6±4.6%, recovery: 120.7±4.5%, p0.05) for brachial blood pressure. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that an acute bout of resistance exercise significantly alters aortic wave reflection characteristics but not aortic pulse wave velocity or brachial blood pressure.