Abstract Title

High-intensity exercise on central and peripheral vascular function

Abstract

PROBLEM: Vascular responses to high-intensity exercise are currently unknown. METHODS: Nine young, healthy men (mean±SD; Age: 22±2 yrs; Ht: 1.72±0.04m; Wt: 77.2±5.3kg; Body fat percentage: 10.2±2.7%) participated in the study. The high-intensity exercise consisted of 3 sets of 30-second all-out effort Wingate Anaerobic Tests (WAT) with 2 minutes of rest between each set. Each WAT utilized 7.5% of body weight on the flywheel. Measurements were taken at rest and 5 minutes after completion of the WATs. Central and peripheral vascular functions were assessed via carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse wave reflection, respectively. RESULTS: There was no change in carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (rest: 5.56±0.59 m/sec; recovery: 5.73±0.53m/sec) in response to the WATs. In addition, there was no significant change in the augmentation index (rest: 7.32±10.96%; recovery: 6.44±8.0%) from rest to recovery. However, there was a significant (pCONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that high-intensity exercise may not affect central aortic function to the same degree as peripheral vascular function.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Exercise Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. J. Derek Kingley

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

11-3-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

11-3-2015 5:00 PM

Research Area

Exercise Science

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Mar 11th, 1:00 PM Mar 11th, 5:00 PM

High-intensity exercise on central and peripheral vascular function

PROBLEM: Vascular responses to high-intensity exercise are currently unknown. METHODS: Nine young, healthy men (mean±SD; Age: 22±2 yrs; Ht: 1.72±0.04m; Wt: 77.2±5.3kg; Body fat percentage: 10.2±2.7%) participated in the study. The high-intensity exercise consisted of 3 sets of 30-second all-out effort Wingate Anaerobic Tests (WAT) with 2 minutes of rest between each set. Each WAT utilized 7.5% of body weight on the flywheel. Measurements were taken at rest and 5 minutes after completion of the WATs. Central and peripheral vascular functions were assessed via carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse wave reflection, respectively. RESULTS: There was no change in carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (rest: 5.56±0.59 m/sec; recovery: 5.73±0.53m/sec) in response to the WATs. In addition, there was no significant change in the augmentation index (rest: 7.32±10.96%; recovery: 6.44±8.0%) from rest to recovery. However, there was a significant (pCONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that high-intensity exercise may not affect central aortic function to the same degree as peripheral vascular function.