Abstract Title

The Moderating Role of Attachment Style in the Associations between Work-Home Interference, Relationship Satisfaction, and Job Satisfaction

Abstract

Work-home interference is increasing due to challenges in balancing the demands of home and work environments. Yet, certain individuals are more susceptible to interference than others. We predicted that individuals’ attachment styles would influence the effects of work-home interference on relationship and job satisfaction. Participants (N = 150) completed online questionnaires measuring relationship satisfaction, job satisfaction, perceived work-home interference, and attachment styles. We examined the associations between work-home interference and relationship/job satisfaction, and attachment styles as moderators of these associations using regression analysis. Results indicated significant negative main effects of attachment avoidance on relationship satisfaction, and work-to-home interference on job satisfaction. Contrary to our predictions, attachment styles did not moderate the effects of work-home interference on job and relationship satisfaction. Although results indicate associations between attachment styles and relationship satisfaction, as well as work-home interference and job satisfaction, it is unclear how individual differences influence the effects of work-home interference.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Judith Gere

Mentor #2 Information

Ms. Alex Chong

Presentation Format

Oral

Start Date

11-3-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

11-3-2015 5:00 PM

Research Area

Personality and Social Contexts | Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences | Social Psychology

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The Moderating Role of Attachment Style in the Associations between Work-Home Interference, Relationship Satisfaction, and Job Satisfaction

Work-home interference is increasing due to challenges in balancing the demands of home and work environments. Yet, certain individuals are more susceptible to interference than others. We predicted that individuals’ attachment styles would influence the effects of work-home interference on relationship and job satisfaction. Participants (N = 150) completed online questionnaires measuring relationship satisfaction, job satisfaction, perceived work-home interference, and attachment styles. We examined the associations between work-home interference and relationship/job satisfaction, and attachment styles as moderators of these associations using regression analysis. Results indicated significant negative main effects of attachment avoidance on relationship satisfaction, and work-to-home interference on job satisfaction. Contrary to our predictions, attachment styles did not moderate the effects of work-home interference on job and relationship satisfaction. Although results indicate associations between attachment styles and relationship satisfaction, as well as work-home interference and job satisfaction, it is unclear how individual differences influence the effects of work-home interference.