Abstract Title

Examining the Relationship between Impulsivity and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors in College Students

Abstract

Problem: Previous research has shown a significant relationship between impulsivity and hair pulling. To date, however, little research has examined this relationship in other body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs), such as skin picking and nail biting. The purpose of the current study is to examine these relationships; we predict that students with high scores on a task of impulsivity will report higher skin picking and nail biting severity.

Method: Two hundred and sixty undergraduate students at Kent State University completed the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales, Nail Biting Scale, Skin Picking Scale, and the Stop-Signal Task as part of a larger assessment battery.

Results: Two hierarchical regression analyses showed non-significant relationships between impulsivity and nail biting/skin picking, after controlling for anxiety and depression scores.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Christopher Flessner

Mentor #2 Information

Ms. Sarah Francazio

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

11-3-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

11-3-2015 5:00 PM

Research Area

Clinical Psychology | Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Examining the Relationship between Impulsivity and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors in College Students

Problem: Previous research has shown a significant relationship between impulsivity and hair pulling. To date, however, little research has examined this relationship in other body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs), such as skin picking and nail biting. The purpose of the current study is to examine these relationships; we predict that students with high scores on a task of impulsivity will report higher skin picking and nail biting severity.

Method: Two hundred and sixty undergraduate students at Kent State University completed the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales, Nail Biting Scale, Skin Picking Scale, and the Stop-Signal Task as part of a larger assessment battery.

Results: Two hierarchical regression analyses showed non-significant relationships between impulsivity and nail biting/skin picking, after controlling for anxiety and depression scores.