Abstract Title

The Mediating Effects of Smoking on the Relationship between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and PTSD-related Sleep Disturbances

Abstract

PTSD rates in the United States are an estimated 7-9%. PTSD is associated with a variety of negative health behaviors and consequences, including sleep disturbances. Studies show that 70-87% of individuals with PTSD will report poor sleep quality, a 48-60% increase from those without PTSD. Another consequence that is commonly associated with PTSD is smoking addiction. Individuals with PTSD have 2 to 4 times the risk of smoking addiction than those without PTSD. Furthermore, sleep disturbances and smoking are commonly related, as significantly more smokers than non-smokers (28.1% compared to 19.1%) demonstrate disturbed sleep quality. Moreover, higher degrees of nicotine dependence are associated with shorter sleep duration. The current study examines the relationship between PTSD symptoms (PTSS), smoking addiction, and sleep disturbances in a sample of 659 college students. Results from a mediation analysis with 10,000 bootstrapped resamples indicated that smoking addiction mediated the relationship between PTSS and sleep disturbances [F(1, 637) = 13.88, p =

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Doug Delahanty

Mentor #2 Information

Brian Smith

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

11-3-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

11-3-2015 5:00 PM

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Biosketch

Research Area

Clinical Psychology

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The Mediating Effects of Smoking on the Relationship between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and PTSD-related Sleep Disturbances

PTSD rates in the United States are an estimated 7-9%. PTSD is associated with a variety of negative health behaviors and consequences, including sleep disturbances. Studies show that 70-87% of individuals with PTSD will report poor sleep quality, a 48-60% increase from those without PTSD. Another consequence that is commonly associated with PTSD is smoking addiction. Individuals with PTSD have 2 to 4 times the risk of smoking addiction than those without PTSD. Furthermore, sleep disturbances and smoking are commonly related, as significantly more smokers than non-smokers (28.1% compared to 19.1%) demonstrate disturbed sleep quality. Moreover, higher degrees of nicotine dependence are associated with shorter sleep duration. The current study examines the relationship between PTSD symptoms (PTSS), smoking addiction, and sleep disturbances in a sample of 659 college students. Results from a mediation analysis with 10,000 bootstrapped resamples indicated that smoking addiction mediated the relationship between PTSS and sleep disturbances [F(1, 637) = 13.88, p =