Abstract

Because Sr2+ can substitute for Ba2+, Sr can readily incorporate into Barite. Two formations can result: Sr-bearing Barite or SrSO4, also know as Celestine. I propose to answer which formation will result and if both form: what the abundance ratio of Sr bearing phases are and the distribution whether heterogeneous or homogeneous.

I have examined samples collected from modern barite from continental hot water springs and compared them to samples synthesized in the lab. Barite that has precipitated in these environments is examined to understand the processes that control the fractionation of Sr in barite. Strontium is an isotope that occurs in natural samples and is a dating indicator. This project aims to understand the controls on variations in Sr distribution from natural and synthetic samples. Possible controls on Sr distribution could include temperature and secondary mineral precipitation. As the strontium replaces barium in barite it can form the mineral Celestine. The impact is that it is important to understand the fractionation of Sr as this could establish a biological presence in ancient or extraterrestrial rocks, and give an understanding of the paleo environment.

Research Category

Geology/Geography

Primary Author's Major

Geology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. David Singer

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

11-3-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

11-3-2015 5:00 PM

Research Area

Geology

Included in

Geology Commons

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Mar 11th, 1:00 PM Mar 11th, 5:00 PM

Determining the Sr-bearing host phase in terrestrial and synthetic barite by synchrotron x-ray microprobe analysis.

Because Sr2+ can substitute for Ba2+, Sr can readily incorporate into Barite. Two formations can result: Sr-bearing Barite or SrSO4, also know as Celestine. I propose to answer which formation will result and if both form: what the abundance ratio of Sr bearing phases are and the distribution whether heterogeneous or homogeneous.

I have examined samples collected from modern barite from continental hot water springs and compared them to samples synthesized in the lab. Barite that has precipitated in these environments is examined to understand the processes that control the fractionation of Sr in barite. Strontium is an isotope that occurs in natural samples and is a dating indicator. This project aims to understand the controls on variations in Sr distribution from natural and synthetic samples. Possible controls on Sr distribution could include temperature and secondary mineral precipitation. As the strontium replaces barium in barite it can form the mineral Celestine. The impact is that it is important to understand the fractionation of Sr as this could establish a biological presence in ancient or extraterrestrial rocks, and give an understanding of the paleo environment.