Abstract Title

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Alternative Paneling Systems for the Greenhouse at Cunningham Hall to Optimize Energy Spending

Abstract

The Greenhouse at Cunningham Hall was designed and built using single-paned glass panels, which prove to be energy inefficient thus increasing the operational costs of the facility. Furthermore, the structural failure of many panels has increased heat loss making the need to renovate the greenhouse a necessity.This research proposes to perform a cost-benefit analysis of the greenhouse. An energy model of the greenhouse is used to quantify the energy consumption of alternative paneling systems. We hypothesize that the use of glass panels with greater thermal coefficients would reduce energy spending of the greenhouse creating benefits that outweigh the cost of the upgrade over the panels’ lifespan. The selection of the optimal paneling system would be the one with appropriate thermal coefficient and visual transmission characteristics at the lowest life-cycle cost. Using these methodologies, we would be able to appropriately renovate the greenhouse, which would result in reduced energy spendings whilst creating a thermally accurate environment for biological research. In addition, a similar methodology may be implemented in other university buildings to economize energy spending throughout the Kent Campus.

Research Category

Architecture

Primary Author's Major

Architecture

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Adil Sharag-Eldin

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Rui Liu

Start Date

11-3-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

11-3-2015 5:00 PM

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Research Area

Architectural Technology | Architecture | Environmental Design

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Mar 11th, 1:00 PM Mar 11th, 5:00 PM

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Alternative Paneling Systems for the Greenhouse at Cunningham Hall to Optimize Energy Spending

The Greenhouse at Cunningham Hall was designed and built using single-paned glass panels, which prove to be energy inefficient thus increasing the operational costs of the facility. Furthermore, the structural failure of many panels has increased heat loss making the need to renovate the greenhouse a necessity.This research proposes to perform a cost-benefit analysis of the greenhouse. An energy model of the greenhouse is used to quantify the energy consumption of alternative paneling systems. We hypothesize that the use of glass panels with greater thermal coefficients would reduce energy spending of the greenhouse creating benefits that outweigh the cost of the upgrade over the panels’ lifespan. The selection of the optimal paneling system would be the one with appropriate thermal coefficient and visual transmission characteristics at the lowest life-cycle cost. Using these methodologies, we would be able to appropriately renovate the greenhouse, which would result in reduced energy spendings whilst creating a thermally accurate environment for biological research. In addition, a similar methodology may be implemented in other university buildings to economize energy spending throughout the Kent Campus.