Location

128 Science & Nursing Building

Start Date

28-4-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 9:25 AM

Description

A previously well known and loved German teacher and composer of the 18th century, Gottfried August Homilius’ (1714-1785) setting of the "Our Father" – more commonly referred to as the "Lord's Prayer"– reflects some of the chief aims of music during the Baroque Period: touch the listener’s heart and move their affections. Composed in 1776, “Unser Vater in dem Himmel” contains expressive music and lovely melodies. Alongside these, expressive text-setting achieves elevation of the sacred text by plumbing the depths of its meaning and calling to mind its context. Homilius' dramatic musical setting brings a richness to the well-known text while urging the listener, or singer, to consider its meaning. The "Our Father" is made more enjoyable alongside the music of “Unser Vater in dem Himmel.” To separate the music and text is possible, but each would lose an ally.

Comments

Glorianne Earley is a senior Honors student at Kent State University. She is completing a B.M. in music composition. Currently, she is studying composition with Dr. Frank Wiley. Following graduation, she plans to attend graduate school to pursue a Master’s degree in music composition.

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Apr 28th, 9:00 AM Apr 28th, 9:25 AM

Moving the Affections: A Survey of Humilius’ “Unser Vater in dem Himmel”

128 Science & Nursing Building

A previously well known and loved German teacher and composer of the 18th century, Gottfried August Homilius’ (1714-1785) setting of the "Our Father" – more commonly referred to as the "Lord's Prayer"– reflects some of the chief aims of music during the Baroque Period: touch the listener’s heart and move their affections. Composed in 1776, “Unser Vater in dem Himmel” contains expressive music and lovely melodies. Alongside these, expressive text-setting achieves elevation of the sacred text by plumbing the depths of its meaning and calling to mind its context. Homilius' dramatic musical setting brings a richness to the well-known text while urging the listener, or singer, to consider its meaning. The "Our Father" is made more enjoyable alongside the music of “Unser Vater in dem Himmel.” To separate the music and text is possible, but each would lose an ally.