Event Title

Swords, Shields & Sex: Literary Knighthood and Medieval Constructions of Masculinity

Location

128 Science & Nursing Building

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 1:45 PM

Description

Perhaps the most enduring image from the Middle Ages is that of the knight. This archetype has endured in our pop cultural consciousness for centuries and informs much of our perception of the era. However, much of our perceptions of knights is through the lens of people living in the 21st century. How did the depiction of the knight in medieval literature impact people reading during the Middle Ages? And how did this perception impact the perception of men in society? This analysis will focus on different depictions of Arthurian characters; through an analysis of the chivalric code and the sometimes conflicting standards appearing in much of the literature, a medieval masculine ideal becomes apparent.

Comments

John C. Polles is a junior English major with minors in writing and LGBTQ studies. He works as senior tutor at the Writing Center and is president of the English Club and co-chair of Continuum. His studies primarily focus on issues of difference in literature, gender and sexuality, and writing centers.

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Apr 28th, 1:15 PM Apr 28th, 1:45 PM

Swords, Shields & Sex: Literary Knighthood and Medieval Constructions of Masculinity

128 Science & Nursing Building

Perhaps the most enduring image from the Middle Ages is that of the knight. This archetype has endured in our pop cultural consciousness for centuries and informs much of our perception of the era. However, much of our perceptions of knights is through the lens of people living in the 21st century. How did the depiction of the knight in medieval literature impact people reading during the Middle Ages? And how did this perception impact the perception of men in society? This analysis will focus on different depictions of Arthurian characters; through an analysis of the chivalric code and the sometimes conflicting standards appearing in much of the literature, a medieval masculine ideal becomes apparent.