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2017
Friday, April 28th
8:00 AM

The Effects of Feminine Hygiene and Beauty Products on Vaginal Health

Ellie Camerato, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

8:00 AM - 8:25 AM

The female reproductive system is a rather sensitive region compared to other parts of the body, and the vagina itself contains lactobacilli, which regulate the pH and overall vaginal ecosystem. The balance maintained by these microbes is easily disoriented, which can lead to vaginal infection due to pathogenic microbes prevailing over beneficial ones. The purpose of this research was to discover if the use of feminine hygiene products and beauty products leads to the increase in vaginal infections and that these infections do not solely arise based on the vaginal ecosystem itself. A large range of scientific and medical literature was examined for information on the correlation between product use and likelihood of infection, as well as risks associated with the ingredients in products used. A list of ingredients from some common products was also gathered and compared to information found in the literature. It was found that with only some instances of benefits of some female products, there is a strong correlation between the use of several different products and the increase in vaginal infection, which can then lead to more major complications. There are alternatives that can be used in place of harmful products, but an overall increase and improvement on information available and education seems to be a key factor in decreasing these potential problems.

The Threats of GMOs

Daphnie Neal, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

8:00 AM - 8:25 AM

This paper will focus on summarizing the threats of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by critically analyzing the problems associated with them in our food industry. The problems associated with genetically modified foods, such as patents created by corporations, toxins, increased cancer risks and environmental hazards, outweigh the benefits of them in our food industry. This paper discusses these arguments and the effects GMOs have on humans and the environment. Moreover, biotechnology companies create patents on genetically modified crops, which harms local farmers with the threats of litigation for inadvertently using patented seeds. Health risks such as toxins and increased risks of cancer also threaten humans who consume genetically engineered crops. The implications surrounding these health risks have caused other countries like the European Union and Canada to ban GMOs. Environmental hazards contribute to a decrease in insect and plant populations. This paper expands on the importance of individual actions to help deter GMOs from threatening our world.

8:30 AM

Joan Jett and the Women’s Liberation Movement

Stacey Shelton, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

Joan Jett’s journey embodied the journey of the Women’s Liberation Movement, also called the second- wave feminist movement, which demanded equal rights for women in both public and private spheres. Joan Jett is known as an icon for the Riot Grrrl Movement, also called the third-wave feminist movement, an underground feminist punk movement that combined feminist consciousness, punk style and politics. Jett and the movement have comparable journeys because they involved women who struggled for equality. Both entities challenged the traditional definition of the word ‘woman.’ Both were slammed by critics who said they did not have the right to self-determination and should be denied equal opportunity because they were women. Through the use of secondary sources to provide context and arguments, I will then use primary sources to provide evidence to the arguments. After applying this methodology, it will be clear how Joan Jett’s journey embodied the journey of the Women’s Liberation Movement. The journeys of the Women’s Movement and Joan Jett are significant to the lives of women because both laid the foundations for the progressive movements and social change of the present day.

The Ability of Musca domestica to Sequester Metal into their Prestomal Teet

Kentlyn Weaver, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

House flies (Musca domestica) feed on fluids from various substrates. Their proboscis contains prestomal teeth (tooth-like structures), which are thought to function as a tool to expose fluids when feeding. It has been shown that other arthropods have the ability to sequester metal to specific body regions for increased fitness. Therefore, we hypothesize that M. domestica have the ability to sequester zinc into their their prestomal teeth for greater rigidity and better access to liquids, which could result in increased fitness. To test our hypothesis we raised larvae in three diets with 3 mg, 1 mg, and 0.5 mg of zinc per gram of diet. Once the larvae emerged as adults, the prestomal teeth were analyzed through EDS using a scanning electron microscope.

9:00 AM

Hall of Fame Village Project

Darrick Boord, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

My presentation is on the Hall of Fame Village project. I plan to discuss the impact of the project on the community and on the Hall's mission. I will be examining both the historical impact and the economic impact on the neighborhood, the city, county and region. I plan to speak with representatives from the Hall of Fame, local government and civic agencies, as well as neighborhood residents (if possible) to determine their feeling, opinions and outlook on the project. I will be examining the funding and potential costs to taxpayers, as well as the projected financial and economic benefits to the community. My presentation will include an individual oral report, as well as a visual poster/newspaper project. I plan to include renderings of the Hall of Fame Village, as well as photos of the current progress and possibly graphics of the data behind the Hall of Fame Village project.

Lafayette and Washington: How the Marquis de Lafayette was Integral in the Growth of Washington’s Legend

Gregg Giegel, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

This paper, in a larger sense, seeks to explain how and in what ways did George Washington’s military record help to influence his growing reputation. The best way to examine this is by looking at his comrades in arms to see how they wrote and spoke about him. A number of prominent figures were present in Washington’s life including men like Horatio Gates and Charles Lee in a purely professional capacity and men like Alexander Hamilton, Nathanael Greene, Henry Knox and the Marquis de Lafayette who worked closely with Washington during his military service and developed a deep personal relationship as well. In particular, the ways in which Marquis de Lafayette, one of the closest members of this inner circle contributed to the legend of Washington is the focus of this work. The Memoirs of Lafayette, published in 1837, a short time after his death in 1834, is an excellent way of exploring just how deep the friendship, mentorship and affection was between Washington and Lafayette and also shows how Lafayette, even at this early stage in their relationship, was already expressing his admiration and respect for Washington to almost everyone he met or corresponded with.

Following this presentation, Gregg will present with a foreign language group from 11 a.m. - noon in Science and Nursing room 101.

Moving the Affections: A Survey of Humilius’ “Unser Vater in dem Himmel”

Glorianne Earley, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

A previously well known and loved German teacher and composer of the 18th century, Gottfried August Homilius’ (1714-1785) setting of the "Our Father" – more commonly referred to as the "Lord's Prayer"– reflects some of the chief aims of music during the Baroque Period: touch the listener’s heart and move their affections. Composed in 1776, “Unser Vater in dem Himmel” contains expressive music and lovely melodies. Alongside these, expressive text-setting achieves elevation of the sacred text by plumbing the depths of its meaning and calling to mind its context. Homilius' dramatic musical setting brings a richness to the well-known text while urging the listener, or singer, to consider its meaning. The "Our Father" is made more enjoyable alongside the music of “Unser Vater in dem Himmel.” To separate the music and text is possible, but each would lose an ally.

9:30 AM

Elemental Composition of the Ovipositors of Periodical and Annial Cicadas

Kristen Reiter, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

Metals, such as zinc and manganese, are found in the cuticle of insect structures that are adapted for cutting or piercing substrates. Termite mandibles, for instance, have metals in the cuticle, which provide increased hardening necessary for chewing on wood. Cicadas are known to oviposit (lay eggs) in woody branches. We hypothesized that cicadas have metals in the cuticle of their ovipositors, increasing individual fitness by strengthening the cuticle to improve successful oviposition into hard wood. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine the elemental composition of the cuticle of ovipositors of periodical and annual cicadas. We hypothesize that elemental distribution varies among different structures on the ovipositor and between genera. Manganese, calcium, and potassium, and other elements related to cuticle hardness were found in varying concentrations along ovipositors of all cicada species, with greater metal deposits at the distal regions.

Following this presentation, Kristen will have a poster on display from 2:45 - 3 p.m. in the Science & Nursing room 101 lobby.

Khrushchev and the Hungarian Revolution: Changing Perceptions of a New Soviet Leadership

Daniel Muhich, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 was a nationwide uprising against the communist Hungarian government and, by extension, the Soviet Union, patron state of numerous communist countries during the Cold War. Nikita Khrushchev, the General Secretary of the Communist Party in the Soviet Union, was successor to Joseph Stalin, who led the country until his death in March 1953. Khrushchev was keen to overhaul Stalin’s policies at home and abroad, as outlined in his “Secret Speech” before the 20th Congress of the Communist Party in 1956, just months before the outbreak of revolution in Hungary. I propose an examination of the Hungarian Revolution as an event that demonstrated fundamental differences between Khrushchev’s approach to leadership, which emphasized collaboration and consultation, and that of his predecessor, Joseph Stalin, whose dictatorial style circumscribed opposition to his personal prerogatives as supreme leader of the Soviet Union.

Weiss: Western Identities Seen and Searched

Emily Weiss, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

This past year has provided me with a new perspective on global awareness. Specifically dealing with China and its culture, my goal is to enlighten others about what I have experienced and researched about the eastern identity. Last summer, I had the opportunity to travel to Jiaozhou, China and teach English to people of a variety of ages. Upon returning home, the Honors Program gave me the chance to work with our Chinese students as one of their Conversation Partners. After working so closely with the culture, I decided to create a magazine to showcase how western and eastern identities compare. Highlighting my personal experience, my work with the international students, interviews with current professors and external research, I want to focus on how our cultures are more similar than society makes them to be.

10:30 AM

How the Aggression of the Kennedy Administration Played a Major Part in the Soviet’s Building the Berlin Wall

Jacob Dessecker, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

This presentation will be about how the Kennedy Administration played a major part in giving the Soviets a reason to build the Berlin Wall. To prove the reasoning for this, it will be backed up by looking at major events during the Cold War: the Vienna Summit, the aftermath of the Bay of Pigs Invasion and the tensions surrounding the Cuban Missile Crisis. Primary sources are used whenever possible to support the argument presented.

Interaction Adaptation Theory in Cross Sex Friendships Literature Review

Daniel Casey, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

Interaction adaptation theory (IAT) seeks to explain how individuals will react in dyadic exchanges based on their expectations, desires, and requirements for that situation. This paper explains the foundations of IAT and examines IAT within the context of cross-sex heterosexual friendships where one or both members of the relational dyad wishes to escalate the relationships level of intimacy. Existing social networks are very influential on relationships likelihood to escalate. Similarly, an individual’s attachment style will also impact their willingness to escalate a relationship. Societal norms also play a role in how individuals expect their relational partners to behave. There are also significant differences between males and females in regards to adaptive behaviors and expectations within a relationship. In general, IAT research should be expanded to the context of different types of established relationships. Most of the existing research focuses on interactions between strangers.

The North American Free Trade Agreement

Nicholas Abel, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

The present paper will discuss the“North American Free Trade Agreement," widely known as NAFTA. It will first talk about the history of NAFTA, why it was created, and who was affected by its creation. Then the presentation will describe how NAFTA works and what the rules and regulations are for the agreement and how it is used in today's world. My presentation will further highlight the criticisms of this free trade as pointed out by a section of economists. In conclusion, the future of the NAFTA will be delineated. Specifically how things may end up changing and the effects of potential new policy changes on NAFTA.

11:00 AM

Argentine Immigration (1890-1914)

Nicolas Curtis, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Throughout my honors course, I have been conducting research and synthesizing a report of my findings regarding immigration to Argentina between the years 1890 and 1914. My research especially surrounds the effects of these immigration groups on Argentine culture and the economic prosperity during this period. Cause and effects of different racial and ethnic migrations to Argentina will also be discussed in order to understand the effects at a greater level. During the presentation, I will give a general review of my findings as well as enlighten the audience on current Argentine culture. I will also explain reasons I chose this topic as my Independent Study and how it will proliferate my success throughout my school career and my strides towards a degree in Spanish.

El Parque Nacional Torres Del Paine

Kathryn Reiter, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

In my presentation, I will discuss El Parque de Torres del Paine, a National Park in Chile. The park is one of 11 protected wilderness areas of the Magallanes Region and Chilean Antarctica, which combined make up 51% of that region. It is one of Chile's largest and its third most visited national park. There are a variety of surroundings found in the park including, mountains, valleys, lakes, rivers and glaciers. An edition of National Geographic named El Parque de Torres del Paine the fifth most beautiful place, and El Parque was also named the eighth Wonder of the World in 2013. At El Parque, tourists are able to camp, trek, kayak, go on horseback riding tours, ice walk and even bird watch. El Parque de Torres del Paine is a very important place of interest in Chile and it should continue to be preserved for its marvelous beauty.

Health Care in Uruguay

Leslie Wood, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

I would like to do a brief presentation in Spanish about the health care system in Uruguay. It is a slightly expanded version of a speaking exercise from Intermediate Spanish II, dealing with Uruguay’s universal system of health care and insurance coverage. I will also make some brief comparisons with the current health care system in the United States, as well as some universal coverage systems from other major countries. I initially took interest in this topic because of the culture section of the chapter we were covering in class. Also, my major is sociology with a concentration in medical sociology, and I am currently taking the Sociology of Health and Health Care, so I have had the opportunity to further research the health care system in Uruguay in relation to those in other countries for a comparative analysis project.

Las Ciudades en Chile: Valparaíso y Viña Del Mar

Angela Karavas, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

In this presentation, I will provide a brief description of various aspects of two coastal cities in the country of Chile. The two cities that will be discussed are Valparaíso and Viña Del Mar. Several places of interest when traveling to each of these cities will be included in the presentation. There will also be information pertaining to a musical event, an international song festival, which takes place every year in Viña Del Mar.

Les lieux et les choses célèbres de la Normandie (The famous places and things of Normandy)

Gregg Giegel, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

In this French language presentation, the region of Normandy and some of its most prominent landmarks are explored. Particular attention is paid to structures and events from the medieval period, a tumultuous time in Normandy’s history. The numerous fortifications and castles present in Normandy that were built by the Normans and later, the English, as well as the French, are the primary focus of the presentation. Some of the visited sites include: the abbey at Mont-Saint-Michel, the towns and cities of Caen, Rouen and Bayeux and a number of the aforementioned castles throughout the region. Viewers interested in travel or simply viewing a presentation in French may find this presentation useful and enjoyable. The wide variety of architecture present in the region is also examined.

PANEL: Gendered Themes in Popular Media

Hannah Churilla, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Ashley Goff, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Cody Silverthorn, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

In this panel, students will present their textual analyses of the gender messages embedded in four pieces of popular media. By analyzing the dynamics of characters within media, conclusions can be drawn about the usefulness of media in current society.

Hannah Churilla - “Exploring Gender Roles and Stereotypes in Cinema: The Perks of Being a Wallflower”

Ashley Goff - “Quid Pro Quo and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”

Cody Silverthorn - "Meriwether’s New Girl”

11:30 AM

Investigation of Antimicrobial Properties of Butterfly Saliva

Valerie Kramer, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Butterflies feed on a variety of fluids including nectar, sap and rotting fruit, which host a diversity of microbial communities. Butterflies who feed on these substrates are ingesting their food as well as the microbes that live in it. Ingesting microbes could potentially reduce the butterfly’s fitness. We hypothesized that the saliva of butterflies has anti-microbial properties that combat the microbial communities in butterfly food sources. In order to test this, butterfly saliva was collected and analyzed in a mix of Pseudomonas and Micrococcus for microbial inhibition. While experimental flaws have slowed progress, further investigation through flow cytometry will allow for more reliable and accurate data. Our preliminary research indicates bacterial growth is inhibited in the presence of butterfly saliva.

Using Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Suicide in Youth

Kara Kimevski, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Suicide is highly prevalent among youth, and it is a topic that needs to be publicly addressed. Suicide is an unfortunate occurrence in the United States. My 20 minute oral presentation will discuss using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to prevent suicide in youth, particularly in adolescents with depressive symptoms. CBT is a research-based psychotherapy that works on taking negative thoughts and behaviors and turning them into positive ones. By changing thoughts, it is possible to change behaviors. I will address what CBT is and three different studies that show the effectiveness of CBT. Each study uses CBT in different ways; by showing different techniques, it allows comparing and contrasting of the different methods. The presentation will also discuss why teenagers attempt suicide and statistics about suicide in adolescents. Warning signs of suicidal thoughts will also be presented because it is important to recognize the signs before it is too late.

1:15 PM

Lie Group Variational Integrators and Applications to Flight Control

Samuel Vidovich, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

1:15 PM - 1:45 PM

On February 23rd of this year, following an aborted mission on the 22nd, the unmanned SpaceX capsule Dragon successfully delivered 5,500 pounds of supplies to the International Space Station. Thrust control of a spacecraft such as Dragon is an active and evolving area of research in the field of aerospace engineering. Recent decades have seen the development of techniques for simulation of spacecraft attitude control known as Lie group variational integrators.

In this project, I implement Lie group variational integrators as well as optimal control strategies for a spacecraft. Primary software development was done in C++ with output visualization handled by Mathematica. The spacecraft simulated is a faithful approximation of publicly released SpaceX designs for the Dragon2; including mass, inertia matrix, and thruster placement. In this poster are presented some of the mathematics used in the modeling as well as some visualizations of simulated test flights.

Losing Your Voice

Seth Marcum, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

1:15 PM - 1:45 PM

Over the last 100 years, you have been losing your voice simply for the sake of political convenience. Our Congress is delegating much of its power to the Executive Branch, threatening the Separation of Powers. The Supreme Court, unwilling to address the issue, adopted the Intelligible Principle Test without addressing the constitutionality of the delegation of power. This presentation explains the Judicial History which allowed Congress to delegate away its power. It provides proposed solutions to weaken Congress’ ability to delegate away our voice and to allow us to hold Congress accountable for controversial decisions they would rather delegate away.

Swords, Shields & Sex: Literary Knighthood and Medieval Constructions of Masculinity

John C. Polles, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

1:15 PM - 1:45 PM

Perhaps the most enduring image from the Middle Ages is that of the knight. This archetype has endured in our pop cultural consciousness for centuries and informs much of our perception of the era. However, much of our perceptions of knights is through the lens of people living in the 21st century. How did the depiction of the knight in medieval literature impact people reading during the Middle Ages? And how did this perception impact the perception of men in society? This analysis will focus on different depictions of Arthurian characters; through an analysis of the chivalric code and the sometimes conflicting standards appearing in much of the literature, a medieval masculine ideal becomes apparent.

1:45 PM

A Movement for Authenticity: American Indian Representations in Film 1990-Present

Raya Williamson, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

1:45 PM - 2:15 PM

From the feared warrior and noble savage to the Indian princess and helpless squaw, American Indians have fallen into constructed stereotypes on film. These constructs, which began with the arrival of Europeans to the New World, eventually formed the ‘Hollywood Indian,’ a culmination of the Native stereotypes represented throughout American film history. Audiences were thrilled with the grand conquests, adventures, and heroes of Western-era films; however, others viewed the films as consistent reminders of defeat, betrayal, and unimaginable loss. Many are familiar with the cultural wrongdoings of Western-era films, but where does the Hollywood Indian live in our modern-day films? How do the films impact society? In my research presentation for the Student Conference, I will analyze American Indian representations in film – and their societal impacts – from 1990 to present. I argue the era, despite its faults carried from earlier Western films, caters to a consumer-driven period for authenticity.

SILENT VIDEO: Happiness Presented as Beauty

Sydney Ziss, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

1:45 PM - 2:15 PM

This video takes a look into how society relates happiness with beauty. We are shown that beautiful people are happy, but that does not mean that to be happy, one must be beautiful. Body acceptance has become a big movement in the past few years, but there is still a long way to go. Pictures of models in magazines, the actors on television, and the people on the runway all influence children and teens - more than one would expect. Unfortunately, eating disorders are prevalent in teens partially due to the slim models seen on the daily. The reason we are told that beauty brings happiness is because it does. Beauty does not always mean the standard seenin magazines, it can mean beautiful scenery, a place you find relaxing or a meal with your family. Beauty is all around us. We need to begin looking for beauty in the places and faces around us and the beauty in ourselves will shine through.

The Women of NASA: The Six Women of TFNG and the Effects, Challenges and Rewards of Being Women in the Space Program

Abby Scheiman Brown, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

1:45 PM - 2:15 PM

The “thirty-five new guys”, affectionately known as TFNG, was the 1978 class of trainees for NASA’s space program. TFNG were the first class of Astronauts since 1969 and a ground-breaking class for multiple reasons. It was the first group to include African American astronauts, Asian American astronauts, and the first official class of astronauts to include women. Of the 35 astronauts in TFNG, six of them were women, namely Dr. Judith Resnik, Dr. Sally Ride, Dr. Rhea Seddon, Sr. Kathryn Sullivan, Dr. Shannon Lucid, and Dr. Anna Fisher.

In this paper, we will explore the roles of NASA’s first official women to join the space program. We will do so not only by looking at NASA’s history with women and the history of the six astronauts, but by looking at multiple factors. Why were these women chosen? Were they chosen for their education or for their job potential? How did having women in the space program change NASA? We will also explore the relationships between the male and female astronauts. How did they get along? How did the social structures (such as sexism and attitudes towards women on the job) of the late 1970s contribute to the relationships? How were the relationships between the class of TFNG - between the six women and the 29 men?

By exploring these questions, we will better understand the trials and tribulations women have overcome on the road to gender equality, and have the chance to learn about a moment of women’s history that certainly deserves to have its day in the sun.

2:15 PM

College Student Mental Health and The JED Campus Program

Rylie Woods, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

2:15 PM - 2:45 PM

College students are a population of young adults that encounter their own set of challenges throughout their educational career. One of these challenges is the prospect of mental illness, as it is becoming more prevalent in college students today. Colleges and universities are scrambling to help their students and find solutions to this growing problem. Several programs have been designed to specifically focus on college student mental health, one of which is the JED Campus Program. The JED Campus Program follows an all-encompassing structure to assist colleges and universities in improving their mental health programming on campus. The purpose of this presentation is to examine college student mental health and the JED Campus Program. The main points of this presentation will discuss mental illness risk among college students, challenges that college counseling centers face, the JED Campus Program and current research that aligns with the components of the JED Campus Program.

Literature of Thomas Paine

Alex Kiel, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

2:15 PM - 2:45 PM

My presentation covers the literature of Thomas Paine and it's precedence on the society in which we live. I believe that his work has long been overshadowed by time and willful ignorance. The man who I am presenting about was a founding member of the first abolitionist society, along with Benjamin Franklin, and was a violent critic of theocracy and divine right to rule. He championed the power of the individual. His work helped fuel our war of independence against the English crown and helped ignite the fire of reason which inspired another generation of free thinkers. It absolutely marvels me that there was a man who existed with these opinions over 200 years ago.

Witches and Working Women: How the “Myth” of the Midwife-Witch Gave Birth to Man-Midwifery

Jennifer Sveda, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

2:15 PM - 2:45 PM

The European witch-hunt of 1450-1750 CE resulted in the executions of thousands of accused witches and also transformed the psychological, social and cultural landscape of Europe. One significant change is the decline of female midwives in the late 17th century. The ties between midwifery and witchcraft, though clealy highlighted in anti-witch literature and beliefs, have not been sufficiently explored by historians as a factor contributing to the decline of female midwifery and the subsequent rise of the man-midwife. Rather, historians have dismissed this connection, citing the low number of midwives tried for witchcraft, especially in England, the country studied here. Thus, historians have ignored the impact of internalized cultural beliefs that manifested in distrust and fear of female midwives. This slideshow presentation explains how expectations of midwives, witchcraft beliefs, and the practice of man-midwives interacted to ultimately undermine women’s role as midwives, leading to their replacement with male doctors.

2:45 PM

Architects of the Holocaust

Fredrick Hutson, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

The presentation will be on several of the key architects of the Holocaust, and the key ideas will be based on the events leading up to the beginning of the concentration camp system, specifically Auschwitz. Notable events will include the passing of the Nuremberg Laws, which sought to identify Jews in German occupied territories, the formation of the Einsatzgruppen, or mobile killing units, first formed in Soviet Russia. Livingconditions in the camp system will also be explored, in order to include work details, and the gas chambers. The methodology employed by the Nazis to gas millions of Jews during this time will be scientifically broken down. It is widely known that throughout the concentration camp system medical experimentation took place on an unprecedented scale. Several of the major figures involved in conducting these experiments, such as Josef Mengele, will be explored as well as the types of procedures performed.

3:15 PM

Entrance of the United States into World War II was Imminent Regardless of Pearl Harbor

Alexandra Rutkowski, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

3:15 PM - 3:45 PM

The most commonly accepted idea about World War II is that the United States entered the war because of the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The truth is that the United States had promised to remain neutral throughout the war, specifically shown with the passing of the Acts of Neutrality in the mid-1930s. President Roosevelt however, was strongly against these acts and believed that the United States should not remain neutral. He also believed in helping the allied powers, those who were allies of the United States, during this time. His staff strongly urged him to put his focus on the United States and the betterment of his country, rather than focusing on what was occurring on another continent. However, Roosevelt knew that there was too much of a global issue to ignore. Roosevelt offered an ear to Prime Minister Churchill whenever he needed, and the two talked constantly about the war and how to proceed forward. While the United States passed the last Neutrality Act, Churchill and Roosevelt were talking about the United States Navy learning sonar and the possibility of the United States transporting several ships to the British for British use. The objective of this paper is to show that President Roosevelt always intended to go to war. Through the analysis of outside sources, as well as letters from Roosevelt to Churchill, the paper will show that the reason the United States went to war was not, in fact, due to Pearl Harbor, but because Roosevelt knew the United States could not remain neutral and was going to be involved in World War II.

The Evolution of the Final Girl in Slasher Films

Jimmy Schindewolf, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

3:15 PM - 3:45 PM

Who is the final girl? This presentation takes a look at the progression of one of the horror genre's most timeless tropes and the changes it has gone through over the span of film history. It takes look at the archetypal journey of the final girl, as she is evolving from being a character who is the virgin into one that takes on traits of the amazon. A more feminist attitude will be seen as one observes the increase of final girls in modern slasher films who don't need a male figure to come save them in the end. Examples of final girls shown will include older characters such as Laurie Strode from John Carpenter's Halloween (1978) as well as more modern final girls, such as Sidney Prescott from Scream (1996) and Erin from You're Next (2011). This presentation will explore what this says about our society and what progress we've made and what progress we still need to make in terms of feminism.

Thelonious Monk and the Civil Rights Movement

Timothy White, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

3:15 PM - 3:45 PM

During the Civil Rights Movement, Thelonious Monk became an active advocate for rights while also reaching peak popularity in his jazz career. Not only did he use his career platform to help advocate for change, but he also became well known for his views within the movement. However, historical discussions often stop at stating the actions jazz musicians did to help the movement rather than ever measuring and analyzing the impact that they had. Because Monk did so much for the movement and its culture, it is possible to analyze his actions and measure the impact that they had on Civil Rights culture. Explaining the impact which Monk had can help others to form hypotheses on the link between social movements and artistic expression.

The main problem is that most histories regarding musicians like Monk is that they tend to shy away from commenting on any measurable impact that they may have had on the culture, population, and finances of the Civil Rights Movement. Instead, most histories only focus on the actions themselves and do not analyze much further. Due to an abundance of secondary sources, data and interviews with Monk himself, it is now possible to make inferences regarding a tangible influence he had over the movement.

Using quotes from Monk, it is possible to measure his intentions and how he envisioned his role in the battle for Civil Rights. In addition, Ingrid Monson’s article “Monk Meets SNCC” is rich in primary and secondary sources as well as conclusive data measuring certain outcomes of rallies that Monk played. These measurements include categories like voter registration numbers and money raised at benefit concerts played by Monk. In order to measure the impact from the evidence provided, one must also look at the correlation between Monk’s popularity or the state of his career and the rising involvement of the masses in the Civil Rights Movement.

Once taken into consideration, it is possible to see that Monk’s growing popularity peaks during key moments in the Civil Rights Movement. Likewise, at times of peak tension in the movement, Monk uses his elevated platform for charity to the cause resulting. By being one of many spokesmen for black musicians during the Civil Rights Movement and providing favors in the form of benefit concerts for Civil Rights groups, Monk was able to solidify his position as a Civil Rights activist. Not only did he solidify his position, but he made it possible to measure and argue the impact that his position had on the culture and finances of the Civil Rights Movement.

3:45 PM

The Modern Purpose of the Scandinavian Goddess Freya

Amanda Large, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

3:45 PM - 4:15 PM

There were many figures that the Scandinavian people looked to for religious purposes. One of those figures was Freya, the goddess of the Valkyries, known for fertility and beauty. She seems to be much unknown and still widely depicted in paintings. She provided dual purposes for the Norse people of both life and death. For many cultures those representations belonged to two separate deities. Fascination with her purpose and tales of her beauty were the source of paintings years later. Concepts of beauty have long been used as propaganda and debated for health reasons, but those ideas came from somewhere. In order to find the source of the Viking influence on beauty, we need to examine their ideal figure of beauty, the goddess Freya, and the fascination that non-Viking Europeans had with her. What cultural concepts of beauty did the Vikings bring with them to the British Isles during the Viking age? Why, or why not, have those ideas and concepts continued and spread? Analyzing imagery long after the Viking age will decipher the answers, and provide some explanations.