Poster Sessions

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2017
Friday, April 28th
10:00 AM

Determining Paleodepth by the Examination of Microfossils

Adam Behringer, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Foraminifera are an amazing group of animals. Despite their microscopic size, they have had a large impact on our understanding of climate and ocean history. Studying the diversity of Foraminifera, their abundance, and complex morphology, scientists have been able to write crucial theories pertaining to paleoclimatology and paleoceanography. The oxygen isotopes of their tests indicate past climatic conditions. In addition, their speciation and age in the fossil record provide a record of past ocean depths and conditions as certain species occupy particular depths and temperatures. The relationship Foraminifera have with special oceanic environments has made their study a useful tool in locating and extracting hydrocarbons.

Effect of Phytocannabinoids and Endocannabinoids on Ovarian Cancer Cell Proliferation

Bert Crawford, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

The phytocannabinoids tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) exhibit antiproliferative effect on cancer cells derived from multiple organs, including thyroid, brain, prostate and breast. Therefore, I hypothesized that ovarian cancer cell proliferation will be also inhibited by these cannabinoids. To test my hypothesis, I carried out the experiments as follows: Subconfluent SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells were incubated with the above cannabinoids in serum-free medium for two days. Subsequently, both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to determine the effects of these compounds on the cells. THC and CBD and R-1 methanandamide (MEA), a metabolically stable analog of anandamide, inhibited cell proliferation and induced rounding and detachment of the cells. 2-AG, however, exhibited no antiproliferative effect. The differential effects of cannabinoids on SKOV3 cell proliferation partly support my hypothesis.

Fluorescence Microscopy

Nathan Haas, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

I investigated different types of protists using fluorescence microscopy, namely paramecium, euglena, and amoebas. Every organism has its own chromosome number. For instance, humans have a chromosome number of 46, or 23 pairs. Paramecium has a chromosome number of 40, euglena has a number of 45, and amoeba has a number of 500. My main objective was to correlate chromosome number to the relative size of the nucleus for each protist. My hypothesis is that the higher the chromosome number, the larger the nucleus will be.

Isometric Growth Pattern Between Cabbage Butterfly (Pieris rapae) Larval Head Capsule Sizes and Bite Size

Valerie Kramer, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Many species of butterfly larvae feed on vascular plant material, such as leaves, using mandibular mouthparts adapted for chewing through these materials. Larval growth is classified in terms of instars, which are separated by ecdysal events, where the larva molts its outer skin, including a head capsule that contains the mandibles. As larval instars progress in number, the larvae and head capsule increase in size. I hypothesized that as the head capsule size increased, so would the bite size of the larva, producing an isometric relationship. Cabbage butterfly (Pieris rapae) larvae were fed a new cabbage leaf each day and the bite size on the leaf was quantified for each instar using confocal microscopy. After each molting event, the head capsule was collected and imaged with scanning electron microscopy and measured with ImageJ software.

Following this poster display, Valerie will present from 11:30 a.m. - noon. in Science & Nursing room 124.

Microscopy

Adrien Whitmore, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Polyploidy occurs when an organism contains more than two sets of chromosome. One example of polyploidy is found in strawberries, which can have up to eight sets of chromosomes (octoploidy). It is expected that the size of the nucleus will be in direct relationship with the amount of DNA it contains, therefore, it is hypothesized that a strawberry with additional sets of chromosomes will have a larger nucleus. This will be tested using confocal microscopy in which the nucleus of cells from strawberries with different ploidies will be viewed and compared. Their cells will first be stained to cause the nuclei to fluoresce, and those cells will then be viewed simultaneously to make a direct comparison between the sizes of the nuclei.

Nitrite (NO2-) and Nitrate (NO3-) Productions in Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS)

Amanda Powell

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Nitric oxide (NO) is a product of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NOS catalyzes the oxidation of L-arginine to form NO. NO plays important roles in the cardiovascular, nervous and immune systems. To form NO, there must be an electron transfer between the oxygenase and reductase domains. The electron flows from NADPH to FAD, FMN and the oxygenase domain heme during catalysis. The NO that is released can be further oxidized to form nitrite, while heme-NO complex can also be converted to nitrate. We will focus on the percentage of nitrite and nitrate productions that occur in the three NOS isoforms. Our preliminary data indicated that more nitrate than nitrite was produced in both iNOS and nNOS isoforms. Experiments using NO donor (NOC-12) are still undergoing.

Obstetric Clinical Case Study: A 26-year-old Woman with Placenta Previa

Madison Hoenes, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Ryan Few, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Obstetrics is a unique discipline of healthcare in which nurses play a crucial role in the childbearing experience. The labor and delivery nurse is expected to utilize current evidence based practice and think critically to provide safe, effective, patient-centered care throughout the antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum periods. This case study investigates a 26-year-old, Caucasian female diagnosed with placenta previa and her newborn. We selected this client as the focus of this case study due to her poor prenatal care, high-risk delivery and psychosocial disorders. The client was diagnosed with placenta previa in her second trimester, allowing us to further explore the condition, including the pathophysiology and symptoms of a low-lying placenta, risk factors associated with its development and the best indicated maternal and fetal treatment. We aimed to gain knowledge about nursing care during the labor and delivery period by studying and analyzing the collected laboratory data, diagnostic tests and results, medications and assessments of the client to formulate nursing diagnoses and interventions to aid in the promotion of a safe and healthy postpartum period. This poster presentation will serve as a visual aid to explore the pathophysiology and care of our client, a high-risk individual, throughout the stages of her pregnancy and delivery, as well as postpartum care and concerns.

Parental Presence During Pediatric Care

Abbigail Erb, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Stephanie Hann, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Regina Hershberger, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Jasmine Hye, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

As nursing students interested in careers in pediatric nursing, we wanted to understand the implications and evidence-based research behind having parents present during their child’s invasive procedures and how it corresponds to safe nursing practice and improved patient/parent satisfaction. We conducted a literature review of the current research and literature from the last five years, including randomized controlled trials, literature reviews, qualitative descriptive studies and reports of expert committees. We found that the choice for parents to decide whether they are present during their child’s procedure corresponded to higher levels of satisfaction with their child’s overall care. While parental presence did not improve the child’s experience, it did allow parents to move from a bystander role into a more active role in their child’s care. Based on our findings, we found there is enough evidence to change current practices.

Pokémon GO’s Impact on the Frequency of Face-To-Face Interactions Among Users

Daniel Casey, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

This research project examined the impact mobile app Pokémon GO has had on its user’s frequency of face-to-face interactions. We wanted to see if the app was encouraging users to interact more with other users. Typically, mobile devices are associated with exclusive and antisocial behaviors. When an individual is using a mobile device, that individual tends to close himself or herself off from the immediate environment and surrounding individuals. Our research found that Pokémon GO actually increased the frequency of face-to-face interactions among users. This has unique implications for mobile apps and technology moving forward.

Following this presentation, Daniel will present from 10:30-10:55 a.m. in Science and Nursing room 124

2:45 PM

Brachiopoda and Bryozoa: The Link Between Lineages

Jessica Dudley, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

The main objective of this project is to discover supporting evidence that the seemingly different aquatic invertebrates, Brachiopoda and Bryozoa, are related via a single characteristic feeding organ. The list of organisms that belong to the superphylum Lophotrochozoa is extremely limited, even though their morphologies are vastly different. Through various microscopy techniques, feeding organs are examined and compared as evidence of the link between lineages.

Butterfly Wing Scale Shape: Phylogenetic Relationships or Convergent Evolution

Kristen Reiter, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

The wings of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) are covered with small scales from which the order derives its name. These scales are similar in shape among species and are organized on the wings like shingles. They give the wing its color via pigmentation or structure. I characterized the shape and wettability of wing scales of three species in the family Nymphalidae. Monarch (Danaus plexippus) and viceroy (Limenitis archippus) butteflies represent Müllerian mimics whereas L. archippus and Red-spotted purple butterflies (L. arthemis astyanax) are closely related and hybridize. Scale width, length, and protrusion size and number were measured using ImageJ on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. Wettability was determined via confocal microscopy with Nile Red, a stain that causes hydrophobic surfaces to fluoresce. Previous studies have revealed that butterfly wings are hydrophobic. I hypothesized that wing scale properties are either shared by species that are closely related or are similarly colored.

Florence and Forensics: The Importance of Study Abroad

Courtney Kasturiarachi, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

This poster presentation will display the importance of travel and study abroad. As a first-year student here at Kent State University, I will have my first opportunity to study abroad this summer at the Florence Institute. This poster includes information from my previous travels to Sri Lanka, Spain and Portugal and the experiences that I have gained. I will especially focus on the culture and unique aspects from each country. In Florence I will be taking a unique new class called, FACES: Human Head Anatomy with a Forensic Art Focus. I will provide the details and pictures from this class that Dr. Linda Spurlock will be teaching this June.

Gender, MFQ and Political Partisanship as they Relate to Moral Dilemmas

Scott Ashburn, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

This study examines gender, Moral Foundations Questionnaire scores and political partisanship as they relate to moral dilemmas. MFQ scores are the result of a moral foundations questionnaire. Moral dilemmas were posed through two trolley problems in which the answer was to either push, or not push either a lever or a person. Males and the politically non-partisan were more likely to make more utilitarian decisions, associated with lower purity scores with MFQ. Females showed an opposing dilemma solving strategy associating with higher purity scores.

Investigation of Minimal Media and Chemical Stress on Antibiotic Sensitivity of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens

Rebekah Snyder, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building & Lobby

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

The genus Pseudomonas contains many species that range from harmless commensals to antibioticresistant pathogens. The most dangerous group is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of concern as the source of many antibiotic-resistant infections. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens were used in this study as they exhibit properties similar to those of P. aeruginosa without the issue of pathogenicity. Previous studies with non-pathogenic organisms such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermis have shown an increase in antibiotic sensitivity when grown in the presence of sodium acetate, a known chemical stress agent, on complex media. This project is designed to study the effects of sodium acetate as the sole carbon source on antibiotic sensitivity of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens grown on M9 minimal medium. Antibiotic sensitivity is measured using the standard Kirby-Bauer method.