Event Title

The Effectiveness of Social Stories in Increasing Social Skills in those with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Location

220 Main Hall

Start Date

29-4-2016 11:30 AM

End Date

29-4-2016 11:55 AM

Description

A variety of treatments have been tried to alleviate poor social skills in those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One example, Social Stories, has been researched to evaluate their effectiveness since the 1990s. While there has been extensive research, many are still on the fence about whether or not Social Stories can be considered an evidence-based practice used to improve social skills. A review of the recent literature shows us that social stories can be effective on an individual basis. The research from these studies looks in depth at the creation and execution of social stories. However, while many educational practitioners see social stories as effective treatments, there are many limitations in the existing research findings. This presentation will examine those limitations in depth, while exploring how future research could better identify whether or not social stories can increase social skills in those with autism spectrum disorder.

Comments

Amanda Singleton is a junior at Kent State Stark. She is pursuing a degree in human development and family studies with a focus on family life education. After she graduates, she hopes to make a difference in the families of our local community. She enjoys reading, spending time with her family, and helping others improve their health and wellness.

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Apr 29th, 11:30 AM Apr 29th, 11:55 AM

The Effectiveness of Social Stories in Increasing Social Skills in those with Autism Spectrum Disorder

220 Main Hall

A variety of treatments have been tried to alleviate poor social skills in those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One example, Social Stories, has been researched to evaluate their effectiveness since the 1990s. While there has been extensive research, many are still on the fence about whether or not Social Stories can be considered an evidence-based practice used to improve social skills. A review of the recent literature shows us that social stories can be effective on an individual basis. The research from these studies looks in depth at the creation and execution of social stories. However, while many educational practitioners see social stories as effective treatments, there are many limitations in the existing research findings. This presentation will examine those limitations in depth, while exploring how future research could better identify whether or not social stories can increase social skills in those with autism spectrum disorder.