Event Title

They Can Brawl Like the Guys, Too: How Media Coverage Reinforces Gender Discrimination in Baseball

Location

213 Main Hall

Start Date

29-4-2016 2:15 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 2:40 PM

Description

Baseball is regarded as an important facet to American culture that elicits ideals of comradely and sportsmanship. There are, however, dark nuances that underlies America’s national past time. Women have been consistently shut out of baseball since its creation with the help of mass media reinforcing gender discrimination through its coverage. Through an oral presentation, I will highlight the media’s influence by covering the brawl between the all-women’s team, the Colorado Silver Bullets, and the Americus Travelers, an all men’s team. The media coverage of the event is vast and showed levels of outrage, awe, and focused primarily on the gender of the teams. I will argue that the media response is due to a woman starting a brawl against a man, an action that does not fall within the United States’ perception of femininity, and the reason for the sheer amount of coverage is due to gender alone.

Comments

Michelle Leach is a senior double major in history and psychology. Michelle received the Departmental Award for history this year and hopes to go on to work in the field of psychology. Michelle also worked for two semesters as a undergraduate research assistant with Dr. Heaphy.

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Apr 29th, 2:15 PM Apr 29th, 2:40 PM

They Can Brawl Like the Guys, Too: How Media Coverage Reinforces Gender Discrimination in Baseball

213 Main Hall

Baseball is regarded as an important facet to American culture that elicits ideals of comradely and sportsmanship. There are, however, dark nuances that underlies America’s national past time. Women have been consistently shut out of baseball since its creation with the help of mass media reinforcing gender discrimination through its coverage. Through an oral presentation, I will highlight the media’s influence by covering the brawl between the all-women’s team, the Colorado Silver Bullets, and the Americus Travelers, an all men’s team. The media coverage of the event is vast and showed levels of outrage, awe, and focused primarily on the gender of the teams. I will argue that the media response is due to a woman starting a brawl against a man, an action that does not fall within the United States’ perception of femininity, and the reason for the sheer amount of coverage is due to gender alone.