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2016
Friday, April 29th
8:00 AM

Parental Cellphone Usage and the Effects on Parent-Child Interactions

Amy Kelly, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

8:00 AM - 8:25 AM

Parental cellphone absorption is defined as parents engaging with a cellular device rather than their child. The present study attempted to answer the question of what relationship exists between parental cellphone usage and parent-child interactions. A study of literature was conducted using an inductive approach. While many insist that cellphone use increases the levels of perceived connectedness for users, evidence suggests that this usage is leading to negative and even harmful effects for children and parent-child relationships. Fewer verbal and nonverbal interactions, harsh punishment and insensitivity to children’s needs were all thematic. Children feel a sense of emotional disconnect from their highly absorbed parents. Considering the high level of cell phone use and the ways this technology has permeated daily family life, it is essential to gain a fuller understating of the impact on the relationships between parents and their children and the ways in which parenting practices are implemented.

Resolutions Made, Nothing Done: A Reevaluation of the Grange and Their Attitude Towards Women’s Suffrage

Eli Bosler, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

8:00 AM - 8:25 AM

This research started looking at how progressive the Grange was in their fight for women’s suffrage, however as I dug deeper into the primary sources I found that they may be given too much praise. On paper, the Grange is progressive but when it comes to implementing these changes they are not progressive. This paper looks at the National Grange as well as both Ohio and Michigan State Granges’. This research focuses heavily on primary research. This involved traveling to Ohio State Grange headquarters multiple times, as well as working close with the National Grange in Washington D.C.

The Rhode to Curb Violence in Kent in 1970

Austin Ross, Kent State University

215 Main Hall

8:00 AM - 8:25 AM

The shootings at Kent State University on May 4, 1970 were a culmination of various protests, student and police decisions, and influences from government officials. When discussing the Massacre, a majority of scholars avoid the dilemma of assigning responsibility to one individual: he who gave the permission for the National Guard to be deployed to Kent State. As the evidences presents, it was the “okay” of Governor Rhodes which led to Four Dead at Kent State. The argument is as such: the local law enforcement has tactical plans in place to curb the violence on campus and was unsuccessful without the support of the President of the University, Mayor, and Governor. Thus, the National Guard being deployed to Kent State was the worst-case scenario, but the most necessary with the growing violence on campus in the minds of the high-ranking decision makers.

8:30 AM

Asylum of Williamsburg

Michael Archer, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

The Public Hospital of Colonial Williamsburg was built in 1773 and burned down in 1885. The hospital was rebuilt in 1985. The purpose of this project was to show the architecture and interior of the first insane asylum built. Upon approach many visitors cannot tell that the building is meant for the mentally unstable. Why did the architects not make the hospital look like an asylum? This video tour will explore the grounds and the interior and give an overview of the way the asylum looks inside and out. The video will also explore the living quarters of the patients.

“Common” Core Curriculum: Uncommon Teachings of the American Civil War

Kelley Stevens, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

The American Civil War took place from 1861 to 1865, and this four-year period solidified the existing divide of our nation between the North and the South. Northern and Southern states have been culturally separated for over one hundred and fifty years. How can an event that took place so long ago still be influencing current opinions? The differences in the way the Civil War has been taught in Northern and Southern States is the reason we as a nation are still culturally divided.

Wetlands of Stark County

Holly Rodak, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

I have examined five different wetlands in Stark County at Quail Hollow, Sippo Lake, and Kent Stark. I have completed multiple chemical tests on each wetland and compared the results and the factors that contribute to those results. Factors such as environmental controls, location, purpose, and chemical analysis are included with the analysis.

9:00 AM

2016 Presidential Race - The Counterculture Around Donald Trump

Demi Edwards, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

The 2016 Primary Season has altered long standing ideas of how the modern American political process should be conducted. Donald Trump has capitalized off of the current political climate and is succeeding through the new age tactics he employs. His biggest success has come from empowering a subculture in America that has been relatively quiet in elections past. In my oral presentation, I will examine the Trump subculture and the historical impact of Trump’s campaign by looking at news and social media sources. Then I will focus on one particular symbol employed by Mr. Trump back in early March − an outstretched right arm salute. This was best known for its usage by the Nazi Party and thought to be Roman in origin. I will use historical documentation to bring its usage as a propaganda piece to light, as well as highlight its significance in context to today’s time period.

Music Education in the Twenty-First Century

Rebecca Finley, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

Throughout the history of the United States, music education has been used in public schools for multiple reasons such as to encourage nationalism and teach children how to be part of a social function. Music education in the twenty-first century has been reduced or cut from school curriculum in public schools in favor of more science, math and technology classes. It is important to discuss this topic because for many years, especially during the 1920s to the 1940s, music was an important aspect in children’s education as well as the public lives of Americans. Using this period rather than another in America’s history is vital to supporting this thesis because viewing how music education significantly contributed to the war effort and in the American citizens lives’ during that time provides an excellent example of the benefits of music in our society and why music education is a foundation that should be maintained.

Serrated Structures on Fly and Butterfly Mouthparts Assist in Exposing Fluids for Fluid Uptake from Porous Surfaces

Kentlyn Weaver, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

Flies and butterflies both obtain their nutrition from a diverse selection of substrates such as sap, rotting fruit, trash, dung, and flower nectar using modified mouthparts (proboscis). The proboscis architecture varies among species and has been shown to relate to feeding habits. The purpose of our project is to examine the function of previously unstudied structures on the butterfly and fly proboscises, in particular the dorsal legulae (butterflies) and the prestomal teeth (flies). We hypothesize that the prestomal teeth and modified legulae provide an adaptive advantage when feeding on rotting fruit and sap because the serrations aid in scratching the surface to expose fluids. Our preliminary research includes the examination of microwear patterns on the surfaces of Fruit Rollups ® from which the flies and butterflies feed using scanning electron microscopy and studies of mouthpart movements that might aid in scratching surfaces. We also intend to study the elemental composition of these structures using energy dispersive analysis in search of metal deposits that would provide the mouthparts with more rigidity. Our results could indicate that the some butterflies and flies possess adaptations that aid in fluid uptake from fleshy, porous surfaces, such as rotting fruit.

9:30 AM

A Tour Through Bassett Hall

Paul Bradley, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

The idea of this project consists on taking a trip to Colonial Williamsburg, and taking the tour through the famous “Bassett Hall,” otherwise known as the home of John D. Rockefeller and his wife Abby Aldrich Rockefeller. While everyone cannot take the trip to Williamsburg, it is my goal to conduct research, take photos, and video to provide a virtual tour for current Kent State Stark students. With this tour, I intend to gain the attention of fellow students from other majors and minors, and invite them to take the once a year trip to Colonial Williamsburg.

Diagnosing Empathy: PTSD in Mrs. Dalloway

Donna Mitchell, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

My paper offers a new interpretation of Mrs. Dalloway through proving that Septimus, a World War I army veteran, suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although this diagnosis did not exist at the time of the novel, through using the 2013 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the character can be granted an accurate diagnosis, aiding in understanding the character himself. I will be able to diagnose him due to symptoms such as: hallucinations, apathy, signs of depression, inability to cope, and eventual suicide. In addition to understanding, critical information about the audience will also be granted, such as answering whether or not the audience of 2016 is more empathetic towards Septimus than the audience of the 1920s, therefore changing how the entire novel is read and understood. In addition to the DSM, common attitudes towards what would have been known as “shell shock” will add more information about audience attitudes towards Septimus.

Exposure: Shining a Light on Human Trafficking in Southeast Asia

Jenna Fleming, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

Human trafficking is a booming modern-day slave trade that has ensnared the lives of millions of children, women, and men in major cities and towns across Southeast Asia. This presentation is a result of research compiled on human trafficking activity in the countries of Cambodia and India during an independent honors investigation course with Dr. Leslie Heaphy. The presentation describes the day-to-day lives of those caught in the slave trade in Southeast Asia, discusses the long-term emotional, physical, and mental consequences endured by human trafficking victims, and identifies the actions of human rights organizations that are working to alleviate human trafficking around the globe. The presentation will conclude with suggestions audience members can follow in order to help combat human trafficking both locally and globally.

10:00 AM

Pocahontas: Disney’s History Versus Accurate History

Michael Archer, Kent State University - Stark Campus

221 Main Hall

10:00 AM - 10:25 AM

Disney intentionally manipulated the story of Pocahontas to create a favorable storyline that would increase revenue and be more favorable to audiences worldwide. The problem with this approach is that Disney is using an historical figure, where the history is known. Disney has committed to being culturally sensitive. The decision to change the history ultimately affects the future generations of the Algonquian tribe and children of other cultures. The film is a misrepresentation of historical fact. Disney has a responsibility to inform the viewers of the film’s inaccuracy. This paper is aimed at pointing out Disney’s responsibility to the viewers.

Student Composition Recital

Matthew Raftovich, Kent State University - Stark Campus

Main Hall Auditorium

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM

New Beginnings

Lost Dream

Not Alone

Contact

A Drift

A Time Long Gone

Answered Call

Student Composition Recital

Jacob Jaworsky, Kent State University - Stark Campus

Main Hall Auditorium

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM

Wind in the Trees

My Journey

Student Composition Recital

Jonathan Diehl, Kent State University - Stark Campus

Main Hall Auditorium

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM

Falling in the Dark

Student Composition Recital

Trinity Caver, Kent State University - Stark Campus

Main Hall Auditorium

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM

We’re Waltzing Away

Satyr’s Delight / Composition #2

Implicit Demand for Proof (Twenty One Pilots - arranged by Trinity Caver)

10:30 AM

Fictional Witches throughout Time

Alexis Jones, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Jenn Sveda, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

Belief in the existence of witches has been a prominent part of Western culture for millennia; stereotypes about witches still exist in twenty-first-century America as witches star in books, television series, and movies. Over time, witches have lost their potency as a supernatural threat and been relegated to the benign realm of imagination. We will analyze ten witches from past periods – the Renaissance, Enlightenment, Gothic, and Romantic eras – additionally from modern culture – Willow from Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997-2003), Hermione from Harry Potter (1997-2007) and Elsa from Frozen (2013) – to understand the transformation the stereotype of the witch has undergone. This analysis will suggest why witches possess certain attributes in modern culture and why such attributes are significant to understanding the portrayal of witches. This research is significant because stereotypes about witches influence children and social norms.

The NFL and Television: A Symbiotic Dynasty

Chris Martau, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between the National Football League, television, and the media’s involvement between the two. Burgeoning at relatively the same time, television helped the NFL gain national attention, while the NFL in turn brought monstrous amounts of people in every week, helping television ratings. This symbiotic relationship has evolved over time into one of pop culture’s most powerful partnerships. Even through controversial topics such as domestic violence and the ever-growing impact concussions have had on the game, the National Football League continues to thrive as a media juggernaut, pulling in record amounts of people to watch their games every week. Though there are many factors which contributed to the National Football League’s current dominance over sport in America, television’s effect on and continuing relationship with the NFL has by far been the most important.

Warren vs. Garrison in Reference to the J.F.K. Assassination

Dylan Fouse, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

The J.F.K. assassination is considered one of the most notorious acts of violence in our nation’s history. When President Johnson was inaugurated, one of the first acts he took part in was the founding of the Warren Commission. The Warren Commission’s goal was to look into the J.F.K. assassination, to see if truly Lee Harvey Oswald was the killer. While initially positively received, the commission has come under fire in years after for its inaccuracies and overall methods used. Numerous other governmental groups have taken a look into the J.F.K. assassination, but one non-government man, Jim Garrison took his own approach to the assassination, and even took a man to court for conspiracy to kill President Kennedy. In summary, the main purpose of my proposed conference would be to explore the differences between the Warren Commission and the Garrison Investigation.

11:00 AM

Argentina

Nicolás Curtis, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM

This presentation will encompass some major attractions that are in Argentina and things about the culture. We will discuss briefly, cultural foods and some traditions and what is important to Argentinians. We will also discuss briefly my ties to the culture and my family that lives there in Buenos Aires. Also, we will be learning about the dialect that is unique to this country. Lastly we will wrap up with talking about different cultural influences in the country including the Spanish, Italians and such as well as how they impact the rich culture of Argentina pertaining to food, clothes and traditions in all facets of life. The presentation will also be conducted in the Argentinian dialect to display part of the culture. Some small facts will also be mentioned including the Pope’s tie to Argentina, some famous films that have originated from there, and important history that connects to Argentina.

Frauenroman, The Feminine Mystique, and Fannie Flagg: Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café as Modern(ish) Feminist Literature

Zachary Piette, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM

In Fannie Flagg’s Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café it is possible to discuss the characters through the scope of 2nd and 3rd wave feminism. By analyzing characters and applying key concepts and writings that these movements heralded respectively, (such as Betty Friedan’s 1963 work The Feminine Mystique et. al.), we are able to provide context for behaviors present in the book and gain a sense of the feminist tone that Flagg’s work conveys. Through character analysis, observation of parallel sociological frameworks at play within the book itself, and comparisons to other feminist and proto-feminist authors and their works (Kate Chopin, Virginia Woolf, Zora Neale Hurston, etc.), it is immediately apparent that Flagg’s work is not merely a piece of fiction, but is, in fact a positive representation of modern day feminism, and a welcome addition to the literary canon as such.

Les Châteaux de France

Bethany Earley, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM

There are many beautiful castles and châteaux throughout France, some privately owned and others open to the public. This presentation looks at various aspects of five of these grand châteaux and gives a very brief history of each one. All of the châteaux that are discussed are located either within the Loire Valley or closer to Paris. They are the Château de Monte Cristo, the Château de Chenonceau, the Château de Valençay, the Château de Chambord, and the Château de Fontainebleau. Although the presentation is completely in French, there are pictures on every slide that help demonstrate the exact details which are covered in the PowerPoint.

Nov. 15 Paris Terrorist Attacks

Dana Setting, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM

This presentation was created as an end of semester project for Intermediate French 1, with Dr. Paula Sato. It is a PowerPoint presentation covering the November 2015 Paris terrorist attacks and the refugee crisis that is currently affecting the city. These events have a global impact and are quite relevant to all Americans, but for a class of Francophiles, the lasting impact of these events are important to understand as they will have lasting effects.

The Truth about Global Warming

Muhammad Qayyum, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM

Global warming has been a very hot topic lately, especially with the upcoming elections. Trump, with his strong background in politics and science, believes global warming is nonsense. Obama on the other hand believes that climate change is a real problem that needs addressed sooner that later. Leonardo DiCaprio believes it is an issue of such importance that he gave a speech about the subject when he was awarded an Oscar. Join me as we analyze the data we have gathered for over a hundred years in order to find evidence for or against global warming. This is truly a hot topic.

Viajar a Cuba por Americanos. Si o No?

Joanne Salay, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM

The purpose of the power point is to provide an overview of the history of American/Cuban relations and the steps needed to obtain a travel visa from Cuba, as well as what to expect when visiting the county.

11:30 AM

Exhibit: Journey Through Stark County's Past

Michael Archer, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Paul Bradley, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Chris Martau, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Dani Sprout, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Heather White, Kent State University - Stark Campus

3rd Floor Main Hall

11:30 AM - 11:55 AM

The Bicentennial of Stark County sparked interest in doing a public history project. Paul Bradley, Michael Archer, Chris Martau, Heather White, and Dani Sprout came together to create an exhibit that covered aspects of Stark County history. The exhibit covers these topics: Robert Pinn of the civil war, Hoover, War children of WWII, Meyers Lake Amusement Park and Moonlight Ballroom, and The Canton Bulldogs and Football Hall of Fame. Each researcher took their topic and broke down the history to be able to put the exhibit together with artifacts from museums and personal collections, photos, and timelines. Through research, the group explored the various aspects of Stark County history, focusing on the events and individuals that shaped the area. Though the topics are vastly different, one common thread brought them together: their importance to Stark County as a whole. The reason why each topic was chosen was for their importance to the area. Meyers Lake brought economy and activity to Stark, Hoover brought industry and had a hand in bringing the children to North Canton to protect them from the horrors of war, the Canton Bulldogs brought sport and leisure and the hall of fame brought travelers and history, and Medal of Honor recipient Robert Pinn shows a patriotic nature. It is the hope of the presenters that this exhibit will inspire citizens of Stark County to explore the history that is around them.

Technology: For a Better Economy

Mackenzie Bower, Kent State University - Stark Campus

221 Main Hall

11:30 AM - 11:55 AM

As I dig deep into the world of macroeconomics I will single my attention onto technology and the research and development that goes along with it. I will be able to answer the question “How have the advancements in technology helped in the economic progress of developing nations?” I will take several different nations that are going through a development period currently and see the relationship they have with technology progress. By looking at past technological statistics versus new statistics of developing nations I can decipher whether there is a large enough growth in the standard of living to say that it is helping the economic progress. I will prove that research and development increase the standard of living as well as increase the productivity. My overall goal is to suggest analytically that technological advancements are extremely helpful to developing nations around the globe. By doing so, I will be able to factually support the idea of research and development through technological advances in a developing country with solid proof.

The Effectiveness of Social Stories in Increasing Social Skills in those with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Amanda Singleton, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

11:30 AM - 11:55 AM

A variety of treatments have been tried to alleviate poor social skills in those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One example, Social Stories, has been researched to evaluate their effectiveness since the 1990s. While there has been extensive research, many are still on the fence about whether or not Social Stories can be considered an evidence-based practice used to improve social skills. A review of the recent literature shows us that social stories can be effective on an individual basis. The research from these studies looks in depth at the creation and execution of social stories. However, while many educational practitioners see social stories as effective treatments, there are many limitations in the existing research findings. This presentation will examine those limitations in depth, while exploring how future research could better identify whether or not social stories can increase social skills in those with autism spectrum disorder.

1:15 PM

Men in Tights, Women in Tighter Tights: How Superheroes Inform and Influence the Perceptions of Gender in Children and Adolescents

Bradyn Shively, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

1:15 PM - 1:40 PM

As children and adolescents grow and develop, their personalities and worldviews are being increasingly influenced by that to which they are exposed. One such exposure that potentially holds particular sway over children is popular culture, and one of the largest and most prominent facets of popular culture is the superhero genre. This presentation will examine preexisting research and literature discussing how gender psychology and development in children influences depictions of superheroes and how depictions of superheroes influence gender psychology in children through the lens of Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman, three of the most popular and long-lasting superheroes. More specifically, the presentation will address, via specific depictions of the aforementioned superheroes, issues falling under the umbrella of children’s perception of gender psychology such as stereotypes, body image, self-esteem, masculinity, femininity, cross-gender interactions, make-believe/fantasy-play, and toy-play. Beyond that, the presentation will close with future application of these ideas.

The Effects of Immigration on the U.S. Economy

Leonora Insalaco, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

1:15 PM - 1:40 PM

Immigration helps to build the U.S. economy by creating jobs for American workers. Immigrants are 30% more likely to create a small business than non-immigrants, and immigrants make up 18% of all small business owners. This creates 4.7 million jobs alone for the American people and generates $776 billion annually (Fiscal Policy Institute 2007 reports). The Comprehensive Immigration Reform could create up to 900,000 new jobs and raise the American GDP by .08% to 1.3% in 2012 to 2016. Though in the case of illegal immigration, there are mixed opinions. Many economists say that it hurts America because almost all illegal immigrants use government funded services but very few pay taxes. Because of this, they harm the economy by forcing the people to pay on average about 52 billion more dollars in taxes a year. Other opinions suggest that illegal immigration helps the economy in lowering the cost of labor which directly affects the price of goods sold to the consumer.

The Saliva of Butterflies has Antimicrobial Properties

Valerie Kramer, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

1:15 PM - 1:40 PM

Butterflies feed on a variety of fluids including nectar, sap, and rotting fruit, which host a diversity of microbial communities. Butterflies who feed on these substrates are ingesting their food as well as the microbes that live in it. Ingesting microbes could potentially reduce the butterflies’ fitness. We hypothesized that the saliva of butterflies has anti-microbial properties that combat the microbial communities in butterfly food sources. In order to test this, butterfly saliva was collected and analyzed in a mix of Pseudomonas and Micrococcus for microbial inhibition. Our preliminary research indicates bacterial growth is inhibited in the presence of butterfly saliva.

1:45 PM

D-Day: Was the Ultimate Victory a Strategic Failure

Justin Nalley, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

One of the most important operations in World War II was examined to see if the Ultimate Victory was a strategic failure. There were three different phases that were examined. The first phase, in regards to the operation was the planning and preparation phase. The planning by the Allied key leaders was discussed to entail what was seen as the objectives. The preparation and training that ensued after the initial planning allowed for the key leaders to adjust the planning of how the operation was supposed to go. The next phase was the actual operation. What is looked at is how the operation unfolded. Then the last phase was what actually happened when the operation commenced. Did what happened in the mission match up to what the objectives were in the finalized plans of those in the planning process?

Rates of Fluid Rise in C-shaped Conduits of Split Butterfly Mouthparts

Candace Oprian, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) have elongated, tubular mouthparts termed a “proboscis”, which is used for drawing up fluids. The proboscis is composed of two c-shaped strands (galeae) that come together to form the hollow, straw-like conduit. Previous research has inferred that fluid rise only occurs via action of the sucking pump in the insect’s head, which generates the pressure differential for fluid rise. Here, we provide evidence that capillarity might play an important role in the feeding process. We split the mouthparts of three lepidopteran species and fed them a solution with fluorescent microspheres, dissected them, and observed their gut with confocal microscopy to determine feeding ability. We also straightened and dried proboscis halves and dipped them into fluids to observe capillary rise speeds. We found that butterflies did not feed when their mouthparts were split, possibly because the sucking pump was disabled, which could be necessary for swallowing. Fluid rise occurred in the split proboscises of all species; however, the speed was unexpectedly slowest in the species with a middle-sized conduit. We hypothesize this is due to the enlarged chemosensilla that might impair fluid entry. We suggest that capillarity might have played an essential role in feeding in ancestral Lepidoptera; however, as proboscis length increased in derived species, so did the reliance on a sucking pump to transport fluids.

The New Midlife Crisis: Identity and the Epidemic of Depression and Anxiety in Older Adults

Emily Rinaldi, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Today, the average human lifespan is at an all-time high. While our seniors enjoy the benefits of an improved lifespan, they may also be suffering from a decline in mental health. Previous research has found that as we enter middle adulthood, our risk for depression and anxiety decreases. In later adulthood, rates of mental illness rise significantly. Age is associated with both protective factors, including wisdom and maturity, and risk factors, such as impaired memory and loss of identity. While there are many theories that attempt to explain the relationships between age and mental health, the data often tells a different story. This presentation will review the literature on mental health and aging, as well as new data that ties these two factors to identity, to explore the complex relationship between identity, age, and mental health.

2:15 PM

Flow: Abstracting Mundane Environments

Ariana Parry, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

2:15 PM - 2:40 PM

Every day we encounter environments that are ordinary and unassuming. In my artwork I highlight the mundane environments of my own life in order to bring focus to less celebrated interior and exterior spaces. I question the influence of our daily surroundings on our development as individuals and my artwork attempts to capture my meditation on this matter. Undulating forms and intense colors dominate my oil paintings. Psychology and philosophy heavily influence my work and are the framework for my paintings. In my oral presentation I will address my central sources for inspiration, the formal elements of my work, my working process, and the possible direction for my artwork in the future.

Our Interpretations of the Constitution

Seth Marcum, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

2:15 PM - 2:40 PM

Over the last century the United States, on a federal level, has moved away from the original interpretations of the United States Constitution in legislation and judicial review. This presentation will highlight the comments of authors of the United States Constitution as to the powers of the Federal Government and the abilities afforded to it to in order to maintain the republic. I will highlight cases specifically from the New Deal Era, and a more modern example, McDonnel v. United States. I will compare the language of the court opinions, briefs, and sponsors to those of the authors of the Constitution.

They Can Brawl Like the Guys, Too: How Media Coverage Reinforces Gender Discrimination in Baseball

Michelle Leach, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

2:15 PM - 2:40 PM

Baseball is regarded as an important facet to American culture that elicits ideals of comradely and sportsmanship. There are, however, dark nuances that underlies America’s national past time. Women have been consistently shut out of baseball since its creation with the help of mass media reinforcing gender discrimination through its coverage. Through an oral presentation, I will highlight the media’s influence by covering the brawl between the all-women’s team, the Colorado Silver Bullets, and the Americus Travelers, an all men’s team. The media coverage of the event is vast and showed levels of outrage, awe, and focused primarily on the gender of the teams. I will argue that the media response is due to a woman starting a brawl against a man, an action that does not fall within the United States’ perception of femininity, and the reason for the sheer amount of coverage is due to gender alone.

2:45 PM

Feral Cat Management

Chelsea Blitz, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

2:45 PM - 3:10 PM

Domestic cats are the most popular pet in the United States. Many cats are kept outside or are released to roam free. These outdoor cats function as top predators and recent estimates suggest free-ranging cats kill >1 billion birds and 6.5 billion mammals annually. Some people have taken it upon themselves to care for these feral cats, feeding them and providing shelter. With new cats immigrating into these colonies, there is no accurate way to track the number of individuals and devise a plan to properly control populations. Our goal is to identify feral cat colonies and quantify the number of individuals moving into and out of the colony and track cat home-ranges. This information will help us understand the size of the colonies, the number of individuals moving into and out of the colony, and their impacts on the habitats these cats occupy.

Synapomorphic Features of the Robust Australopithecine Skull: Adaptations for a Robust Masticatory Apparatus

Kristen Reiter, Kent State University

220 Main Hall

2:45 PM - 3:10 PM

The robust Australopithecines, sometimes placed in the genus Paranthropus, consisted of three species and emerged as early as 2.6 million years ago. These species resided in East and South Africa until their extinction 1.4 million years ago and are often considered a “side branch” in hominin evolutionary history. The robust features of the skulls of these species have long been assumed to be adaptations for a hard food diet. In this review, the dentition, mandible, maxilla, palate, basicranium, zygomatic arches and foramina, and sagittal crest that give the robust Australopithecus skull its well-known appearance have been described, then examined for insights into the diet and behavior of these species. Although there is evidence for some hard food eating habits in robust Australopithecines, it is more likely that these species ate hard foods only when more desirable food was not available, and that they generally subsisted on large quantities of low quality food that had to be processed by intense mastication, although there was likely some variation in interspecific diets.

The Taming of Èowyn

Joel Coblentz, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

2:45 PM - 3:10 PM

The Lord of the Rings has always been one of my favorite books. I decided to write an essay that would allow me to dive into both the extensive history that Tolkien created as well as the life of Tolkien himself. The resources I used included an essay comparing Èowyn to a World War Two war bride, an essay identifying the various stages of grief she went through, as well as two biographies of Tolkien; one by Daniel Grotta and one by Humphrey Carpenter. The goal of the essay to try and understand the character of Èowyn as Tolkien would have understood her, and to show that he didn’t write Èowyn to just be a throwaway hero to be forgotten. I believe that she is one of the most vital characters to the novel, as she shows some of the most character development of anybody in the book. This is important to today’s students because she shows that even women in a high fantasy setting from a novel written on the eve of World War 2 can be three dimensional, believable characters. She is a hero, and deserves to be studied with any other literary woman.

3:15 PM

Infidel Women: Examining the Role of Atheist Feminism in the Late Nineteenth- Century American Women’s Rights Movement

Alex Oesch, Kent State University - Stark Campus

215 Main Hall

3:15 PM - 3:40 PM

Religion was a major factor in nineteenth-century American life that also served to reinforce women’s inferior status to men. In this paper, I examine the role of both atheist feminism and Christian feminism in the late nineteenth-century American women’s rights movement, and argue that atheist feminism had a greater influence on the advancement of women’s rights in the years following the Civil War. Though there were a variety of organized religions in America throughout the nineteenth-century, for the sake of this paper I focus strictly on Christianity, as it was the dominant religion at the time. The atheist feminist perspective cited Christianity as the primary source of female oppression and inequality. Atheist feminists argued that the disbelief in Christianity and its teachings was necessary for women to escape their inferior status imposed upon them by Christian orthodoxy. The opposition to the atheist feminist perspective was Christian feminism. Christian feminists supported the teachings of the Bible, and argued that Christianity promoted women’s equality. Atheist feminism has been largely excluded from the history of the women’s rights movement, and many historians cite Christian feminism as the most significant sect of feminism within the movement. However, many of the most important figures in the women’s rights movement advocated irreligious stances toward women’s rights and the history of the women’s rights movement deserves an analysis of the important, yet often overlooked role of atheist feminism in the late nineteenth-century women’s rights movement. The recognition of religion as a force behind the women’s rights movement has brought with it the need to recognize the contribution of irreligion to the women’s rights movement, particularly the role of atheist feminism.

Taxation Practices in an Ideal Economy

Michael Spirnak, Kent State University - Stark Campus

213 Main Hall

3:15 PM - 3:40 PM

Taxation varies in degree depending on global location. Some economies practice socialistic policies, others practice capitalistic policies. However, no existing economy is entirely socialistic or entirely capitalistic. Each economy finds its own balance, which leads to its own level of equality and efficiency. Capitalistic societies are known for the efficient use of resources, and socialistic societies are known for ensuring, at least, a certain minimum standard of living for all people involved in the economy. An economist might suppose there exists a unique point on a taxation continuum which most effectively serves the members of most societies. It seems logical to conclude that an economy that is useful to a society should involve a balance of socialistic and capitalistic provisions. The research included in this article attempts to locate such a point on the taxation spectrum defined above.

The United Nations is a Failure

Chase Yenny, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

3:15 PM - 3:40 PM

In this paper, I argue that the United Nations can be considered a failure according to their own charter, primarily due to Article 1. This article states that one of the purposes of the United Nations is to “To maintain international peace and security.” This phrasing alone is debatable and can be subject to interpretation given that it was written following World War II where genocides and war crimes shocked the world, and a potential World War III was on the horizon. My argument is different from other works on the United Nations in that it focuses primarily on Article 1 of the U.N. Charter.

3:45 PM

Gender in Islam: Negotiating Advocacy

Anna Liebler, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

3:45 PM - 4:10 PM

When Islam is discussed in contemporary discourse, lurking in the background of every discussion is the question of gender. In discussions of gender, the interplay of religion, and specifically Muslim women, is often kept in the margins. This presentation examines the implications of gender in Islam with a specific focus on domestic violence, veiling, and education. Understanding gender as both a lens through which to evaluate the world and as a means of structuring power, the research explores the context and history, the modern manifestation of these concerns, and current resistance and advocacy for change from within Islam. This is a critical inquiry of a variety of sources, including historical analyses, memoirs of Muslim women and girls, spoken testimony of religious leaders, and film. The presentation seeks to identify methods of alleviating the problems from the interaction of religion and gender within a Muslim, non-Western framework.

Gordon Type Nonlinear Equations on Time-space Scale

Zijing Zhang, Kent State University

213 Main Hall

3:45 PM - 4:10 PM

Sine-Gordon Equation was originally introduced by Edmond Bour (1862) in the course of study of surfaces. This equation attracted a lot of attention in the 1970s due to the presence of soliton solutions. In this presentation, Gordon type nonlinear equations are deducted from the well-known Lax Equations using the AKNS (Ablowitz, Kaup, Newell, Segur) method. Further, solutions of these equations are provided with wave visualization using Mathematica.

Mouthpart Conduit Sizes of Fluid-feeding Insects Determine the Ability to Feed from Pores

Kristen Reiter, Kent State University

215 Main Hall

3:45 PM - 4:10 PM

Fluid-feeding insects like butterflies and flies are faced with the common selection pressure of having to remove and feed on fluids from porous surfaces. Insects able to acquire fluids from pores during drought conditions would have an adaptive advantage and increased fitness. We performed feeding trials using magnetic nanoparticle solutions to show that butterflies and flies have mouthparts adapted to pull liquids from pores using capillarity as the governing principle. The ability to feed from pores depends on a relationship between diameter of the mouthparts and pore size diameter; insects with mouthpart diameters larger than pores cannot successfully feed, thus there is a limiting pore size from which individuals can acquire liquids for fluid uptake. Given that natural selection independently favored mouthpart architectures that support these methods of fluid uptake, we suggest that the convergence of this mechanism advocates this as an optimal strategy for pulling fluids from porous surfaces.