Location

220 Main Hall

Start Date

24-4-2015 9:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 9:55 AM

Description

Historians make use of a plethora of material as they search for knowledge of the past, always adding new historiography to the existing literature. Only very recently have a few scholars, notably Joseph Witek, sought to examine comic books for what historians might glean from them about history. This study, the first of its kind in relation to comic books – at least as far as published scholarship – is comparable to Robert Darnton’s work, where he studied sixteenth- and seventeenth-century peasantry folktales to find evidence of their thoughts at the time, by looking at the mentalities they conveyed in their tales. Comic books, similar to folktales in their creative nature and fictional context, are no less useful for examining more recent mentalities. This paper examines two mentalities toward homosexuality in the United States through comic books published by Marvel Comics.

Comments

Adam Yeich is in his final semester at Kent State Stark, graduating in May. He is majoring in history with a minor in creative writing. After graduation, Adam plans to attend graduate school to earn his MFA in fiction writing before becoming a creative writing professor. When he is not at his job or doing school work, he enjoys reading and writing, preferably outside, and spending time his close group of friends.

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Apr 24th, 9:30 AM Apr 24th, 9:55 AM

What Comic Books Say about American Society: The Mentalities Toward Homosexuality as Conveyed by Marvel Comics

220 Main Hall

Historians make use of a plethora of material as they search for knowledge of the past, always adding new historiography to the existing literature. Only very recently have a few scholars, notably Joseph Witek, sought to examine comic books for what historians might glean from them about history. This study, the first of its kind in relation to comic books – at least as far as published scholarship – is comparable to Robert Darnton’s work, where he studied sixteenth- and seventeenth-century peasantry folktales to find evidence of their thoughts at the time, by looking at the mentalities they conveyed in their tales. Comic books, similar to folktales in their creative nature and fictional context, are no less useful for examining more recent mentalities. This paper examines two mentalities toward homosexuality in the United States through comic books published by Marvel Comics.