Location

220 Main Hall

Start Date

24-4-2015 8:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 8:55 AM

Description

Mental health is usually an avoided topic when conversing with others. Despite countless numbers of research studies that show mental illnesses are common and justifiable, there is still a stigma that looms while many remain silent. The purpose of this presentation is to educate the public about mental health awareness along with what people can do to eliminate stigma and communicate about mental illnesses in a better way. Main points of this presentation will discuss stigma, how someone can communicate they have a mental illness, and how those who know someone with a mental illness can communicate with them. Finding methods to fight stigma and communicate more effectively will help the issue of mental health in America move forward. Nothing is going to change overnight, but small steps can slowly start to change the way people look at mental health as well as help people realize how important it is.

Comments

Rylie Woods is a sophomore at Kent State University at Stark. She is majoring in psychology with a minor in interpersonal communication. After she graduates, Rylie plans on attending graduate school so she can become a psychologist. On campus, she is involved in the Honors Program, Active Minds, and the Campus Ambassador organization.

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Apr 24th, 8:30 AM Apr 24th, 8:55 AM

Ending the Silence: Communicating about Mental Health

220 Main Hall

Mental health is usually an avoided topic when conversing with others. Despite countless numbers of research studies that show mental illnesses are common and justifiable, there is still a stigma that looms while many remain silent. The purpose of this presentation is to educate the public about mental health awareness along with what people can do to eliminate stigma and communicate about mental illnesses in a better way. Main points of this presentation will discuss stigma, how someone can communicate they have a mental illness, and how those who know someone with a mental illness can communicate with them. Finding methods to fight stigma and communicate more effectively will help the issue of mental health in America move forward. Nothing is going to change overnight, but small steps can slowly start to change the way people look at mental health as well as help people realize how important it is.