Location

304 Main Hall

Start Date

24-4-2015 1:15 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 1:40 PM

Description

This presentation is devoted to describe the formation of the rainbow. The theory of the rainbow started in the man’s sense of wonder thousands of years ago. About 2,500 years ago, Aristotle suggested the first theories that explain the formation of the rainbow. Many scientists studied and suggested different theories to try to improve the understanding of the appearance of the rainbow. The theories of Aristotle, Descartes, Newton, Fermat, and Snell are specifically described in this presentation. By using several calculus equations, it can be proved that the different colors of the rainbow have different angles of observation. This presentation mainly focuses on the observation angles of red and violet light. The angles of observation for these two colors are also proved to be different in the second rainbow and the third rainbow. Even now in the beginning of the twenty-first century, the formation of the rainbow is not understood in all details.

Comments

Logan Bonecutter is a sophomore at Kent State Stark and is majoring in middle childhood education. Logan is planning on getting her generalist endorsement, so she can possibly teach all subject areas. After she graduates, she hopes to find a job as a fifth or sixth grade math teacher. Logan enjoys reading, and spending time with her family and friends when she is not doing school work.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 1:15 PM Apr 24th, 1:40 PM

Formation of the Rainbow

304 Main Hall

This presentation is devoted to describe the formation of the rainbow. The theory of the rainbow started in the man’s sense of wonder thousands of years ago. About 2,500 years ago, Aristotle suggested the first theories that explain the formation of the rainbow. Many scientists studied and suggested different theories to try to improve the understanding of the appearance of the rainbow. The theories of Aristotle, Descartes, Newton, Fermat, and Snell are specifically described in this presentation. By using several calculus equations, it can be proved that the different colors of the rainbow have different angles of observation. This presentation mainly focuses on the observation angles of red and violet light. The angles of observation for these two colors are also proved to be different in the second rainbow and the third rainbow. Even now in the beginning of the twenty-first century, the formation of the rainbow is not understood in all details.