Poster Session: A Study on Moth Pollination at the Biopond at Kent State Stark

Logan Bonecutter, Kent State University - Stark Campus

Logan Bonecutter is a sophomore at Kent State Stark and is majoring in middle childhood education. Logan is planning on getting her generalist endorsement, so she can possibly teach all subject areas. After she graduates, she hopes to find a job as a fifth or sixth grade math teacher. Logan enjoys reading and spending time with her family and friends when she is not doing school work.

Description

We studied the pollination biology of three nocturnal moth species collected at the Biopond at Kent State Stark. The purpose of this research was to quantify the pollen load on the mouthparts (proboscis and labial palpi) of moth species. We hypothesized that moth species would differ in their pollen load; therefore, moth species differ in their role as pollinators. Moths were collected at the Stark Campus Biopond at night using a white sheet and a 250W mercury vapor light and stored in a -80 degree C freezer. Moth mouthparts were studied with a stereoscope and confocal microscopy to assess pollen load. Our results indicate significant differences in pollen load among species and that pollination patterns might not be based on family-level phylogenetic relationships, but represent species-level, moth-flower interactions. We suggest that additional studies are needed regarding this important insect-plant interaction.

 
Apr 24th, 11:00 AM Apr 24th, 12:00 PM

Poster Session: A Study on Moth Pollination at the Biopond at Kent State Stark

Main Hall Lower Level

We studied the pollination biology of three nocturnal moth species collected at the Biopond at Kent State Stark. The purpose of this research was to quantify the pollen load on the mouthparts (proboscis and labial palpi) of moth species. We hypothesized that moth species would differ in their pollen load; therefore, moth species differ in their role as pollinators. Moths were collected at the Stark Campus Biopond at night using a white sheet and a 250W mercury vapor light and stored in a -80 degree C freezer. Moth mouthparts were studied with a stereoscope and confocal microscopy to assess pollen load. Our results indicate significant differences in pollen load among species and that pollination patterns might not be based on family-level phylogenetic relationships, but represent species-level, moth-flower interactions. We suggest that additional studies are needed regarding this important insect-plant interaction.