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2015
Friday, April 24th
8:30 AM

All Odds Against Private Slovik

Paul Bradley, Kent State University - Stark Campus

304 Main Hall

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

A historian’s role is to research, analyze, interpret, and present the past. When war is thought about, we think of stories that are about heroes, feats of gallantry and valor. We never tend to think about those stories that are never brought up, stories such as Private Slovik, a soldier in the American Army. That’s because these are stories that aren’t recognized as acceptable to the Uniform Code of Military Justice or the laws that govern the military conduct. Private Slovik is the only American deserter that was executed for desertion during World War II. Furthermore, it is estimated that throughout the war, 40,000 Americans committed desertion. William Bradford Huie is a journalist who has expressed Slovik’s story to the world, but as a journalist what makes his recounting of this topic credible to history, being that he’s a journalist and not a historian?

Ending the Silence: Communicating about Mental Health

Rylie Woods, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

Mental health is usually an avoided topic when conversing with others. Despite countless numbers of research studies that show mental illnesses are common and justifiable, there is still a stigma that looms while many remain silent. The purpose of this presentation is to educate the public about mental health awareness along with what people can do to eliminate stigma and communicate about mental illnesses in a better way. Main points of this presentation will discuss stigma, how someone can communicate they have a mental illness, and how those who know someone with a mental illness can communicate with them. Finding methods to fight stigma and communicate more effectively will help the issue of mental health in America move forward. Nothing is going to change overnight, but small steps can slowly start to change the way people look at mental health as well as help people realize how important it is.

Reparations, Lawsuits and the Holocaust

Conley Lucas, Kent State University - Stark Campus

203 Main Hall

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

In 2001, a civil action lawsuit was taken by families of survivors of the Holocaust against the French government owned railroad, Societe Nationale des Chemins de Fer Francais (SNCF). This and other similar lawsuits came before U.S. courts in several states because the SNCF was bidding on contracts to build railroads in the U.S., although they had participated in Nazi Germany’s “Final Solution” by deporting 60,000+ Jews to death camps such as Auschwitz. This lawsuit and others were all dismissed from U.S. courts based on jurisdiction issues. In December 2014, the French and U.S. governments negotiated a settlement for $60 million. This paper will look at the legality of this case as well as the ethical aspect of demanding reparations from “perpetrators” who did not participate in the Holocaust and “victims” who never really experienced the Holocaust.

9:00 AM

Annihilation of the Jewish Race: Premeditation or Product of NSDAP Structure?

Curtis Johnston, Kent State University - Stark Campus

304 Main Hall

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

I will present the research that I am doing for Senior Seminar under Dr. Menning. The presentation will be an individual oral speech based on the paper I am writing on the Intentionalist/Structuralist views of Hitler’s January 30, 1939 speech to the Reichstag. I will go into a brief history of the Intentionalist/Structuralist argument, how each side of the debate relates to the speech. To make my argument, I will present the surrounding politics of the NSDAP in the 1939/1939, past speeches by Hitler, and the concepts of the “Hitler Myth.”

Feeding Abilities of Butterflies with Split Mouthparts

Ashley Lash, Kent State University - Stark Campus

203 Main Hall

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) use specialized mouthparts (proboscis) that consist of two C-shaped galeae that join to act as a conduit for channeling and transporting fluids from pools and wetted surfaces to the gut. Most previous reports assume (via gross morphology) that the proboscis relies on the sucking pump to induce fluid rise, however, recent studies have provided evidence that the proboscis also incorporates capillarity and wettability dynamics for fluid rise. The purpose of this study was to determine if action of the sucking pump is necessary for fluid rise and subsequent feeding. Four treatments of Lepidoptera had proboscises split at different lengths and were submerged (distal region) in a pool of fluid (20% sucrose/ food coloring solution), followed by dissection of the gut to verify feeding. Our results indicated that butterflies with split proboscises retained the ability to feed; however, the amount of fluid decreased with increasing proboscis separation.

The Negative Aspects of Women Working in Munitions Factories

Staci Cope, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

During World War 1, the media portrayed the recruitment of women war workers as a huge success. Women were employed by the thousands, faithfully fulfilling their patriotic duty in support of the men fighting in the war. My research will show the downside for women working in the munitions factories: the dangers they faced from accidental detonations, their contact with chemicals, and the dangers to themselves and their families, the harsh conditions they faced within the factories and their dismissal from these factory positions after the Great War.

World War 1 created labor shortages particularly in factories. Formerly women were not allowed to work in munitions factories, but to fill vacancies and to satisfy the need for additional work, the Women Work Council and Ministry of Munitions launched large recruitment drives. These actions seemed positive because an ever larger number of women were earning ever higher incomes which enable the women to achieve a higher standard of living. These accomplishments however, blinded contemporaries to the downside of war-time work in munitions factories.

The negative aspects of women working in the munitions factories are important because the population was unaware of the conditions these women faced on a daily basis. The Ministry of Munitions did not disclose the dangers the women faced working in the munitions factories. Instead the government used propaganda and the media to lure the women into these positions reinforcing the idea that it was the women’s patriotic duty. The women were seen as a means of producing as many armaments as possible.

9:30 AM

Genetic Analysis Associated with Breast Cancer

Bert Crawford, Kent State University - Stark Campus

304 Main Hall

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

Diseases have been known to mankind since ancient times in history. Some of these diseases can be grouped into multiple categories such as a cancer. Over the years, medications have been improving to either cure or prevent these illnesses. The discovery of genes has given scientists a better understanding of diseases inherited. Genetic testing has helped predict the location of gene mutations. Cancer can be linked to mutations of tumor suppressor genes called BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The Human Genome Project has been very successful on mapping the entire sequence of DNA. The next step is to understand each and every gene in our bodies. As we start to develop better technology, our medications and testing becomes more accurate.

Validation of Secure Network Traffic and Convergence of BB84 to Quantum Mechanics

Jake Adkins, Kent State University - Stark Campus

203 Main Hall

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

This paper presents research on various encryption schemes and their applications in securing data. Specifically, I discuss their vulnerabilities, implementations (both logically and mathematically), and briefly mention their durability against cryptanalysis attacks. I also present their mathematical properties, and theories that are assumed to hold within a security parameter. In particularly, I focus my attention on the RSA (Rivest, Shamir, and Adelman) Encryption Algorithm and AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) Algorithm in CBC mode (Cipher Block Chaining) against chosen-plaintext attacks [1] due to their popularity. I also introduce BB84 (Benett and Brassard 1984) and its relation to the one-time pad encryption scheme. Finally, by analyzing the pros and cons of all of the algorithms, I explain why the use of the one-time pad and BB84 key exchange are inherently superior to other approaches.

What Comic Books Say about American Society: The Mentalities Toward Homosexuality as Conveyed by Marvel Comics

Adam Yeich, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

Historians make use of a plethora of material as they search for knowledge of the past, always adding new historiography to the existing literature. Only very recently have a few scholars, notably Joseph Witek, sought to examine comic books for what historians might glean from them about history. This study, the first of its kind in relation to comic books – at least as far as published scholarship – is comparable to Robert Darnton’s work, where he studied sixteenth- and seventeenth-century peasantry folktales to find evidence of their thoughts at the time, by looking at the mentalities they conveyed in their tales. Comic books, similar to folktales in their creative nature and fictional context, are no less useful for examining more recent mentalities. This paper examines two mentalities toward homosexuality in the United States through comic books published by Marvel Comics.

10:00 AM

Christianity in Antioch, Corinth and Ephesus

Dorvan Byler

203 Main Hall

10:00 AM - 10:25 AM

The development of Christianity in the first century did not occur in a vacuum, but was shaped by previously existing political, religious, and social conditions found in every city throughout the Roman Empire. To demonstrate the importance of these influences on Christianity’s development, I have conducted a comparative study of the political, religious, and social backgrounds and the first century Christian communities found in three different cities: Antioch, Corinth, and Ephesus. By placing three distinct spaces side by side, I will show that each environment produced a Christianity that differed in some ways from other “Christianities” found in the other two cities.

Continuous Exposure: Dessensitization and Repeated Exposure to News Images of Trauma and its Effects on Society

Kristi Garabrandt, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

10:00 AM - 10:25 AM

Mass media’s all-the news, all-the-time approach inundates peoples with images wherever they go. As a result, mass media causes continuous exposure to traumatic images of violent and/or traumatic events. With multiple 24 hour news channels, social media and print media persistently showing repeatedly the same images it is theorized that desensitization and/or compassion fatigue are practically unavoidable. Desensitization is becoming an issue within the media and society especially in regards to photography. My thesis explores several issues: the desensitization effect on society, the effects producing these images has on photographers, and explores the creation of a set of suggestive guidelines for use of these traumatic images by the media.

My presentation will highlight key elements from my thesis and will contain research I have gathered from professional photographers, trauma specialists who deal with these issues, editors, and members Of NPPA Ethics Committee. In addition it will include some of the images covered in my thesis.

Gathering of the 13 Indigenous Grandmothers: Lorraine Bayes

Chris Wobser, Kent State University - Stark Campus

304 Main Hall

10:00 AM - 10:25 AM

Storytelling is a powerful method of communication; it stems from traditional cultures, many of which are represented at the Council of the 13 Indigenous Grandmothers. Photographs have the power to convey emotion and moment, and video has the power to transport the audience to another time and place. In Intro to Video Production, I was able to learn about the 13 Grandmothers, and to choose how to frame the subject, which elements to arrange together, and how to connect them all to visually tell a story.

10:30 AM

Andy Warhol: Five Deaths Seventeen Times

Kelsey Stoddard, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

Andy Warhol, a flamboyant character among Modern artists of the time, is known for the infamous Campbell’s Soup Can along with the Cow Wallpaper. Yet, while exposing audiences to commercialism and consumerism through his works, he also approached social and cultural events and fads during the time period in which Modernism reigned. Warhol’s Five Deaths Seventeen Times in Black and White, a part of his Disasters series, focuses on the infatuation with tragedy among celebrities. However, upon closer investigation, theories of Formalism and Postmodern Pluralism reveal a hidden undertone. Though the work is impactful to the viewer at first glance, one must become actively engaged to truly understand the complexity that is Five Deaths Seventeen Times in Black and White. In a discussion-based presentation, I will reveal the undertone while discussing the cultural context and history of tragedy and Modernism as well as theories relevant to this piece.

The Failed Crusade: A Case Study Concerning the Ku Klux Klan in Akron, Ohio During the 1920s and Educational Reform

Randall Slonaker

304 Main Hall

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

My presentation will focus on an area of relevant historical study that has been neglected until quite recently, namely, the Ku Klux Klan’s focus on educational reform in the 1920s. Specifically, by utilizing local primary source documents, graduate theses, secondary source surveys and journal articles, my presentation will compare and contrast the significant yet neglected case study of the Klan’s brief yet ultimately ineffective takeover of the Akron Public Schoolboard in the 1920s with case studies of other Klan chapters throughout the United States. In doing so, I will illustrate why this organization that boasted over six million members nationwide, including hundreds of large chapters such as that of Akron, Ohio failed to achieve any lasting reforms, even though the organizations stated philosophy and goals seemed to conform with much of mainstream political discourse.

The Humane Reality: The Treatment Dogs Received from the British Military During World War I

Ellie Kohler, Kent State University - Stark Campus

203 Main Hall

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

In 1917, the British War Office launched a program to incorporate dogs into the military to serve as messengers, sentries, and guards. Dogs were pulled from the public sphere where their well-being was safeguarded under the Animal Protection Act of 1911 and placed directly under the control of the military. This paper examines the British Military’s war dog policies, their nutritional guidelines, general protocols, and the culture of care cultivated, in order to glean insight into the motivations responsible for improvements in the level of training, medical attention, and the care and treatment dogs received. This involved examining newspaper articles, memoirs of the founders of the war dogs program, and casualty reports posted by canine advocacy groups. It was found that the military’s impetus to treat dogs more humanely by improving the quality of care stemmed from the necessity for marital success rather than fulfilling a moral obligation.

11:30 AM

WOODWIND QUINTET: New Music for a Woodwind Quintet

Glorianne Earley, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Seth Harbert, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Nathan Hartz, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Stone Szabo, Kent State University - Stark Campus

Main Hall Auditorium

11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Wind quintet (consisting of flute, oboe, clarinet, horn, and bassoon) has been a favored ensemble of composers for centuries. Throughout the semester, these four students have been working on pieces for such an ensemble. During this session the presenters’ compositions will be performed live.

1:15 PM

Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking

Natalie Kopan, Kent State University - Stark Campus

203 Main Hall

1:15 PM - 1:40 PM

Domestic minor sex trafficking (DMST) is a specific sector of human trafficking in which the victims are United States citizens and under the age of 18. This type of trafficking is widespread across the U.S. in every state and every major city. The harms caused by such exploitation is extremely damaging to victims, especially considering a high population of these victims has already faced abuse prior to their trafficking experience. Many of these children that come from abusive and neglectful backgrounds often end up homeless, which makes them especially vulnerable to traffickers. Most victims, if they do escape from the industry, are severely damaged emotionally, mentally, and physically. Therefore, treatment for this population is difficult to provide. The following presentation will propose a prevention program aimed at populations of children at high risk for DMST. This program will have a basis in the building of resiliency, in which children build valuable personality traits and life skills that can help them overcome adversity. This program is theoretical in that it has not been implemented yet, but has groundwork in evidence-based research on similar type programs and the study of resiliency.

Empowerment of Women through the Grange

Eli Bosler, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

1:15 PM - 1:40 PM

By looking at the organizational structure of the Patrons of Husbandry or the Grange, it can be seen that women played a major role in the organization. From day one women were permitted full membership as well as offices in the organization that only women could hold. After looking at the organizational structure, one can see that the organization propelled women to do more than others of the time, as seen through specific examples such as Dora Stockman and others. This was a research paper for the History of Women in the U.S. class that has been reworked to focus more on the impact of the Grange on the women that within the organization, rather than the original purpose of comparison of rural and urban women. Research for this project looked at both primary and secondary sources as well as conducting interviews with a historian and leaders of local Granges and women that have been in the Grange for many years and seeing how it has affected their lives.

Formation of the Rainbow

Logan Bonecutter, Kent State University - Stark Campus

304 Main Hall

1:15 PM - 1:40 PM

This presentation is devoted to describe the formation of the rainbow. The theory of the rainbow started in the man’s sense of wonder thousands of years ago. About 2,500 years ago, Aristotle suggested the first theories that explain the formation of the rainbow. Many scientists studied and suggested different theories to try to improve the understanding of the appearance of the rainbow. The theories of Aristotle, Descartes, Newton, Fermat, and Snell are specifically described in this presentation. By using several calculus equations, it can be proved that the different colors of the rainbow have different angles of observation. This presentation mainly focuses on the observation angles of red and violet light. The angles of observation for these two colors are also proved to be different in the second rainbow and the third rainbow. Even now in the beginning of the twenty-first century, the formation of the rainbow is not understood in all details.

1:45 PM

Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation on a Space Scale

Anita Mizer, Kent State University - Stark Campus

203 Main Hall

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

It is well-known that solitary waves on shallow water can be modeled by nonlinear KdV and nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equations. These equations may be deduced from the operator Lax equation Ablowitz-Kaup-Newel-Segur proposed to use the matrix version of Lax equation to produce solvable nonlinear equation. This presentation gives the extension of the Lax equation on a time-space scale. Using this extension, we deduce NLS on a space scale.

“Not Ask as Favor, But Demand as Right”: 1850 Women’s Rights Convention in Salem, Ohio

Lexie Mellinger, Kent State University - Stark Campus

304 Main Hall

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

“Not Ask as Favor, But Demand as Right”: 1850 Women’s Rights Convention in Salem, Ohio examines the convention which promoted equality for all and women’s suffrage. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony’s six-volume work History of Woman Suffrage, which they first released in 1876, credited this convention with having an influence nationally and internationally. My paper examines this idea. Was this particular convention influential or was it just another convention? Why was Salem, Ohio chosen and who chose it? Salem, at this time, was the leading town in Ohio for the abolitionist movement and had many ties to the Underground Railroad. My paper will examine a link between the two movements. Although the convention was the second of its type in the United States, following the Seneca Falls convention, it differed from its predecessor because it was the first convention run entirely by women; men were not allowed to participate. Apart from Stanton and Anthony in the late 1880s, few historians have written on this topic, therefore most of the information comes directly form primary sources and newspaper clippings from the city of Salem’s newspaper. First, the paper looks at the conditions in the town of Salem around that time, to show why this was the ideal location for a women’s rights convention. In this section a connection between the abolitionist movement which took place in Salem and the women’s rights movement is discussed. The paper then examines what happened during the two day convention.

The Development and Dissemination of Witchcraft through Art

Carol Lazette, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Art and religion have an affinity that cannot really be explained. One can exist without the other, but they both would be a little less interesting without each other. If asked to make a general association of the two, the first response of most people is the Sistine Chapel and Michelangelo. Philosophical history tells us that religion was the first cradle of art. Much thought is given to how art helped develop certain religious beliefs and reinforce others. In Medieval Europe, the notions of religious heresy and its connection to witchcraft were without a doubt helped along by the miniature pictures that were drawn by hand in the margins of handwritten religious manuscripts by men called Illuminators. At the time, religious writings were handwritten manuscripts. These manuscripts were very large, bulky and not available to the generally illiterate population. When the printing press became widely used, the print shops of the Holy Roman Empire, in what is now southern Germany, became the place where people congregated. These people were theologians, magistrates, artists, the artists’ patrons, and generally those who were educated. This is where the iconography of witchcraft was developed. The broomstick for flying, the cauldron for brewing potions, and kissing toads to cast spells were images that were created and spread throughout Europe, and are still in the minds of many today when asked to describe the activities of a witch.

2:15 PM

Association between Resilience and Bully Victimization among Middle Adolescence Students

Taylor Chapanar, Kent State University - Stark Campus

203 Main Hall

2:15 PM - 2:40 PM

There has been little focus on how personal resilience may play a role in some students overcoming being victimized by bullies. This study explores bully victimization in relation to resilience among 62 middle adolescents. Utilizing a paper and pencil survey, the study measured aspects of bullying and resilience using the Gatehouse Bullying Scale, a cyberbullying scale, and a dependent measure of resilience using the Resilience Scale for Adolescence. The study hypothesized that traditional bullying would be a significant predictor of personal competence and structured style. The study also hypothesized that cyberbullying would be a significant predictor of personal competence. Additionally, the study hypothesized that traditionally bullying and cyberbullying would be significant predictors of family cohesion. Findings from the study showed that traditional bullying and cyber bullying were predictive of aspects of personal resilience.

Painted Lady Butterflies and the Proboscis

Valerie Kramer, Kent State University - Stark Campus

304 Main Hall

2:15 PM - 2:40 PM

Most butterflies and moths consume liquids using a proboscis, which is a conduit composed of different structures. The purpose of this study was to determine if proboscis structures of Painted lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui) show allometric growth relationships with body weights and proboscis lengths. We hypothesized that potential differences in structural configurations might affect fluid uptake rates. To test this, we fed larvae different treatments of artificial diet to prompt size differences in adults. We measured six proboscis characters and used the allometric growth equation. There was a significant allometric relationship among the measured characters and body weight and proboscis length; however, there was a lack of significance when fluid uptake rate was considered the dependent variable of measured characters, even though trends indicated positive allometry. Our results indicate the presence of allometric relationships in proboscis structures; however, these changes do not greatly influence fluid uptake rates.

Style Never Dies: Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying and Morrison’s Beloved

Mackenzie Bower, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

2:15 PM - 2:40 PM

William Faulkner and Toni Morrison are American authors who share a specific writing style. Specifically, my analysis compares the ways these authors use Gothic genre in Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying and Morrison’s Beloved. Additionally, I explain their uses of multiple narrators and points of view to show how multiple narrators give separate voices to many characters in contrast to most novels’ single-voiced narrator. My study further explains the shared styles of these novels by exploring sentence structure, flashback, and motif repetition. I evaluate the imagery both authors use to define their characters outside of their physical being. I use examples such as the tree on Sethe’s back in Beloved to show how that image can have a deeper meaning than an inanimate object might. Similarly, I explain how in Faulkner’s novel the broken wagon represents the broken family riding in it. Furthermore, to bring together the authors’ uses of imagery, I note Faulkner’s and Morrison’s depiction of symbolic river crossings. I also explain how images of home, death, and isolation affect the characters. I have used each novel as well as several academic journals to better my understanding of the stylistic characteristics Faulkner and Morrison share.

2:45 PM

A Holistic Case Study of a Patient with Sepsis

Christopher Bell, Kent State University - Stark Campus

203 Main Hall

2:45 PM - 3:10 PM

This paper explores the nursing process in relation to a patient that was taken care of during a gerontological/rehabilitation experience at a skilled nursing facility on September 25, 2014. An introduction to the patient background and medical history are presented and then the current admitting diagnoses and co-morbid conditions are explained. The pathophysiology along with signs and symptoms of each condition are then explored before a formal Gordon’s Function Health assessment is covered. Associated laboratory and medication information is shown and then finally a nursing care of plan is laid out, which includes three nursing diagnoses along with short term goals and interventions for each. This paper is designed to explore from beginning to end the nursing care of a patient and connect all relevant information in a way that permits a better understanding of patient care for the nursing student that attempts to provide holistic care.

Breaking Barriers: Hip-Hop and the American Millenials

Marah Walker, Kent State University - Stark Campus

220 Main Hall

2:45 PM - 3:10 PM

How has hip-hop dancing affected the millennial generation? Hip-hop dance, and the culture which surrounds the style, is precedential in the realm of history, as well as historiography. Dance has made a constant appearance in American history from the Charleston in the 1920s to the modern dance shows on television today. Hip-hop creates new challenges to history as it is still continuing to mold into new forms and affect today’s culture. Dancing is an activity that will always be around. It will never stop being a creative outlet for those that understand its strength and affect. Because hip-hop dancing is associated with the Millennial generation, it follows the guidelines that create the Millennial generation. Both, hip-hop and the Millennials, are accepting and creative. Hip-hop dancing breaking social and racial barriers is something that is happening now. My research has shown that there is not a lot of information on this topic, therefore I can add and share my personal experiences to help make the history of dance stronger.

Gender Roles and the Aging Man

Amy Kelly, Kent State University - Stark Campus

304 Main Hall

2:45 PM - 3:10 PM

The purpose of this study is to examine the ideals upheld by the traditional male role, activities associated with these ideals, and how the ideals and behaviors affect the aging man. It was hypothesized that traditional gender roles have major effects for elderly men. Studies show that men’s behavior is influenced by masculinity within the male gender role. Physical health, mental health and social relationships can all be impacted by prescribing to traditional roles. Furthering the findings from related literature, an in-depth interview was conducted with Michael, 72. Interview reports support previous studies by showing that Mike’s early life choices (smoking, excessive drinking, prioritizing work over family) reflect masculine ideals. Just as literature suggested, the risky behavior Mike engaged in associated with the traditional male role has led him to suffer physically, mentally and socially. It is concluded that traditional gender roles and associated behaviors create negative consequences in physical, mental and social well-being. By exploring the impact of traditional gender roles on the lives of aging men, we will be able to take this knowledge and apply it to methods to prevent or reverse such effects.