Event Title

That’s the Way the Cookie Crumbles: The Effect of Food Craving on Working Memory

Location

Main Hall Lower Level

Start Date

24-4-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 12:00 PM

Description

Previous research has suggested that preoccupying thoughts caused by food craving can impair performance on working memory tasks. This study tests this hypothesis by giving a baseline test of working memory and then randomly assigning participants to one of three experimental groups: 1) cookie craving unsatisfied, 2) cookie craving satisfied, and 3) a control group. Participants in the craving unsatisfied group were given a large chocolate chip cookie and told to look at it and smell it, but not eat it. Instead, they were given celery to eat. Participants in the craving satisfied group were permitted to eat the cookie. We hypothesize that working memory will decline for the craving unsatisfied group but rebound for the group that is allowed to eat the cookie. Implications for the role of preoccupying thoughts in working memory performance will be discussed.

Comments

Salem Psychology Students:

Catherine Shirey is a senior psychology major planning to go into mortuary science.
Kamila McQuaid is a senior psychology major planning to go into clinical psychology.
Serena Biddle is a senior psychology major planning to go into clinical psychology.
Tonya Albaugh is a junior psychology major with a strong background in nursing. Christina Deal is a junior psychology major looking at internships in psychology.
Krystin Davis is a senior psychology major. Kathlena Lattanzio is a senior psychology major interested in counseling for children and adolescents

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Apr 24th, 11:00 AM Apr 24th, 12:00 PM

That’s the Way the Cookie Crumbles: The Effect of Food Craving on Working Memory

Main Hall Lower Level

Previous research has suggested that preoccupying thoughts caused by food craving can impair performance on working memory tasks. This study tests this hypothesis by giving a baseline test of working memory and then randomly assigning participants to one of three experimental groups: 1) cookie craving unsatisfied, 2) cookie craving satisfied, and 3) a control group. Participants in the craving unsatisfied group were given a large chocolate chip cookie and told to look at it and smell it, but not eat it. Instead, they were given celery to eat. Participants in the craving satisfied group were permitted to eat the cookie. We hypothesize that working memory will decline for the craving unsatisfied group but rebound for the group that is allowed to eat the cookie. Implications for the role of preoccupying thoughts in working memory performance will be discussed.