Event Title

Creating the Knowledge Network Behind the Road to Seneca Falls

Location

Room 333

Start Date

25-2-2015 3:00 PM

Description

This session will introduce the concept of social network analysis (SNA) and the use of network theory to explore the social relationships among members of a group or community. Social networks are comprised of nodes (individuals) and links (relationships among individuals). Networks that build out and represent the knowledge of individuals (nodes) are known as knowledge networks. The community of individuals who came together around equality, human and civil rights issues in the Seneca Falls area form a critical historical social and knowledge network but there is neither a social nor a knowledge network representation of this community. How could a group of 100 individuals have such a deep impact on our society? And, how do we continue this tradition of social and knowledge networking? This session is designed for interaction. A “writable” social network representation of the most important 100 individuals will be presented. Participants will be invited to add their thoughts and comments to the large poster. In addition, “blank networks” will be posted around the symposium meeting space for individuals to record individuals they have connected with in the Seneca Falls Dialogues and in other women’s leadership events.

Presenter Bio

Denise A. Harrison has an English Literature degree from Miami of Ohio. She has taught at Kent State University for the past eight years. In addition, Denise holds a cognate in Women’s Studies and actively teaches about the intersections of race, class, gender, sexual orientation and sexual minorities in her college writing courses. She has a background in African American women writers. Her rising interest and scholarship is informed by questions of reproduction equity in the lives of women of color. Ms. Harrison teaches an Honors Colloquium—Shakespeare: Revisited, Early Modern Mirroring the Post-Modern World. As a social activist instructor, Ms. Harrison includes experiential learning in all her courses. In the past two years, she has been instrumental in developing a project that allows students to travel to Seneca Falls, New York to walk in the footsteps of American’s first feminist, Africans seeking freedom and the Indigenous populations calling for basic human and sovereign rights. The project will become a course in Spring 2016.

Denise Bedford is currently the Goodyear Professor of Knowledge Management at Kent State University and is adjunct faculty at Georgetown University’s Communication Culture and Technology program. She teaches a range of courses in knowledge management and enterprise architecture. Her current research interests include communities of practice, use of semantic analysis methods and technologies, knowledge economy, knowledge cities, intellectual capital representation and investments, and knowledge sharing behaviors. Dr. Bedford has a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees from the University of Michigan. In 2010, Dr. Bedford retired from the World Bank as Senior Information Officer. Her experience also includes NASA, Intel Corporation, Stanford University, as well as a variety of consulting engagements.

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Feb 25th, 3:00 PM

Creating the Knowledge Network Behind the Road to Seneca Falls

Room 333

This session will introduce the concept of social network analysis (SNA) and the use of network theory to explore the social relationships among members of a group or community. Social networks are comprised of nodes (individuals) and links (relationships among individuals). Networks that build out and represent the knowledge of individuals (nodes) are known as knowledge networks. The community of individuals who came together around equality, human and civil rights issues in the Seneca Falls area form a critical historical social and knowledge network but there is neither a social nor a knowledge network representation of this community. How could a group of 100 individuals have such a deep impact on our society? And, how do we continue this tradition of social and knowledge networking? This session is designed for interaction. A “writable” social network representation of the most important 100 individuals will be presented. Participants will be invited to add their thoughts and comments to the large poster. In addition, “blank networks” will be posted around the symposium meeting space for individuals to record individuals they have connected with in the Seneca Falls Dialogues and in other women’s leadership events.