Event Title

Panel Discussion: Reflections from the International Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers Conference

Location

First Floor Quiet Study

Start Date

25-2-2015 12:00 PM

Description

Reflections from the International Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers conference, September, 2014, in Spearfish, SD

Box lunches will be served during this session.

Presenter Bio

Denise A. Harrison has an English Literature degree from Miami of Ohio. She has taught at Kent State University for the past eight years. In addition, Denise holds a cognate in Women’s Studies and actively teaches about the intersections of race, class, gender, sexual orientation and sexual minorities in her college writing courses. She has a background in African American women writers. Her rising interest and scholarship is informed by questions of reproduction equity in the lives of women of color. Ms. Harrison teaches an Honors Colloquium—Shakespeare: Revisited, Early Modern Mirroring the Post-Modern World. As a social activist instructor, Ms. Harrison includes experiential learning in all her courses. In the past two years, she has been instrumental in developing a project that allows students to travel to Seneca Falls, New York to walk in the footsteps of American’s first feminist, Africans seeking freedom and the Indigenous populations calling for basic human and sovereign rights. The project will become a course in Spring 2016.

Alene Barnes, Ph.D., is a native of Buffalo, New York, where she received a B.A. degree in Black Studies, as well as an M.A. in Communications and her doctorate in Intercultural Communications, from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Having over 30 years of teaching experience, Dr. Barnes is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Pan-African Studies at Kent State University. To this department, she has introduced to the curriculum a number of courses titled, "The African American Family in Historical Perspective," "The Black Woman: American Historical Perspectives," "Black Folk Tradition," and most recently, "The African American Woman in Contemporary Society." She also team taught "Perspectives in Black Health" with the late Ernest Stewart, M.D. Dr. Barnes has authored several publications related to the Pan-African experience and has been a guest lecturer both nationally and internationally, speaking in various cities in the U.S., as well as Africa, Asia, South America, Europe, the Pacific and Caribbean. Her specialty topics are the Black Family and the Black Woman as she pursues her mission- to commit herself to a movement working with international grass roots organizations to eliminate oppressive forces on women and the Pan-African community. Dr. Alene Barnes is a promoter of culture identity as a power tool for Pan-African unity and loves to travel and experience peoples of diverse cultural backgrounds.

Laura Fong is an award-winning photojournalist; her photos have been published nationally and internationally. Her heartfelt and sensitive documentary work about women’s issues, and military service members and the transition to civilian life have been featured on NPR and in national media. She holds a Master’s Degree in Journalism from Kent State University, where she was awarded a scholarship from the Women’s Center in 2010 and served as a member of the board. Currently, she teaches Digital Science and Multimedia Journalism at Kent State University in addition to her freelance documentary film-making career, while raising her 9-year-old daughter, Lily.

Karen Hillman is the Director of Marketing & Communications for Kent State University Libraries. The Libraries' Communication Office actively promotes library services, resources and events. On behalf of the University Libraries, she attended The 13th Gathering of the International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers held in Spearfish, South Dakota. Her personal interest in the symposium lies in two things: helping women feel confident and comfortable in leadership roles; and furthering a welcoming acceptance of cultural diversity. The University Libraries support and embrace diversity, learning and the pursuit of information. They are also a sponsor of the exhibit and symposium.

Kimberlee Medicine Horn Jackson, Yankton Sioux, is an emerging Native American poet and writer. She studied for and received her MFA in Creative Writing/Poetry at Ashland University. Her current study if for an Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies with George Fox University and in partnership with the North American Institute for Indigenous Theological Studies with an expected graduation date in 2015. Recent publications of her poetry are in The Prairie Wolf Press Review and The Yellow Medicine Review: A Journal of Indigenous Literature, Art and Thought. She has been invited to share her writing at Bowling Green University, Firelands Campus and Ashland Theological Seminary for the Created in God’s Image: Walking Holy Ground Together conference. As an adjunct English professor at Kent State University Geauga Campus, she teaches the Native American Boarding School Era to College Writing II classes because it is still a hidden layer in American history. Her passion is writing and researching past and present concerns for Native Americans, writing about life as a Native American adopted off the reservation under false pretenses and the intersection between traditional ways and Christianity.

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Feb 25th, 12:00 PM

Panel Discussion: Reflections from the International Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers Conference

First Floor Quiet Study

Reflections from the International Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers conference, September, 2014, in Spearfish, SD

Box lunches will be served during this session.