Location

Room 333

Start Date

25-2-2015 2:00 PM

Description

Indigenous Peoples Student Project: Documenting Story Telling though Photographs and Video--Storytelling is a powerful method of communication; I do it with a camera. Telling stories stems from traditional cultures, many of which are represented at the Council of the 13 Indigenous Grandmothers. Photographs have the power to convey emotion and moment, and video has the power to transport the audience to another time and place. I choose how to frame the subject, when to push the button, which elements to arrange together, and how to connect them to tell a story. I also teach this process to students majoring in journalism. At the gathering I was able to photograph the site, the surrounding Black Hills, and interview people who are drawn to the grandmothers and their message. My Intro to Video Production class at the Stark Campus was assigned a project. Students had to tell stories from the photos/audio and video I collected at the conference with little direction from me about my experience. It was an incredible opportunity for them to learn about new cultures, to learn how to find the story, and to interview me to help build narratives. I will be sharing these video pieces and photo prints and bringing the gathering of the 13 Grandmothers experience to Kent State University.

Poems of Kimberlee Medicine Horn Jackson - Sometimes the soft voice, even the silent voice of words on the page can have a lasting impact on the heart and change it forever. For decades, the voices of the Native American Adoptee have been largely unknown and therefore; unheard. Today, more of us Lost Birds and Split feathers find our way back to our Native homelands through DNA testing or other mysterious means that are more than just coincidence. Adoption is another means of Indian removal; my poetry collection “Walking Fire” addresses this topic.

Presenter Bio

Laura Fong is an award-winning photojournalist; her photos have been published nationally and internationally. Her heartfelt and sensitive documentary work about women’s issues, and military service members and the transition to civilian life have been featured on NPR and in national media. She holds a Master’s Degree in Journalism from Kent State University, where she was awarded a scholarship from the Women’s Center in 2010 and served as a member of the board. Currently, she teaches Digital Science and Multimedia Journalism at Kent State University in addition to her freelance documentary film-making career, while raising her 9-year-old daughter, Lily.

Kimberlee Medicine Horn Jackson, Yankton Sioux, is an emerging Native American poet and writer. She studied for and received her MFA in Creative Writing/Poetry at Ashland University. Her current study if for an Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies with George Fox University and in partnership with the North American Institute for Indigenous Theological Studies with an expected graduation date in 2015. Recent publications of her poetry are in The Prairie Wolf Press Review and The Yellow Medicine Review: A Journal of Indigenous Literature, Art and Thought. She has been invited to share her writing at Bowling Green University, Firelands Campus and Ashland Theological Seminary for the Created in God’s Image: Walking Holy Ground Together conference. As an adjunct English professor at Kent State University Geauga Campus, she teaches the Native American Boarding School Era to College Writing II classes because it is still a hidden layer in American history. Her passion is writing and researching past and present concerns for Native Americans, writing about life as a Native American adopted off the reservation under false pretenses and the intersection between traditional ways and Christianity.

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Feb 25th, 2:00 PM

Indigenous Peoples Student Project: Documenting Story Telling though Photographs and Video / Poems

Room 333

Indigenous Peoples Student Project: Documenting Story Telling though Photographs and Video--Storytelling is a powerful method of communication; I do it with a camera. Telling stories stems from traditional cultures, many of which are represented at the Council of the 13 Indigenous Grandmothers. Photographs have the power to convey emotion and moment, and video has the power to transport the audience to another time and place. I choose how to frame the subject, when to push the button, which elements to arrange together, and how to connect them to tell a story. I also teach this process to students majoring in journalism. At the gathering I was able to photograph the site, the surrounding Black Hills, and interview people who are drawn to the grandmothers and their message. My Intro to Video Production class at the Stark Campus was assigned a project. Students had to tell stories from the photos/audio and video I collected at the conference with little direction from me about my experience. It was an incredible opportunity for them to learn about new cultures, to learn how to find the story, and to interview me to help build narratives. I will be sharing these video pieces and photo prints and bringing the gathering of the 13 Grandmothers experience to Kent State University.

Poems of Kimberlee Medicine Horn Jackson - Sometimes the soft voice, even the silent voice of words on the page can have a lasting impact on the heart and change it forever. For decades, the voices of the Native American Adoptee have been largely unknown and therefore; unheard. Today, more of us Lost Birds and Split feathers find our way back to our Native homelands through DNA testing or other mysterious means that are more than just coincidence. Adoption is another means of Indian removal; my poetry collection “Walking Fire” addresses this topic.