Publication Title

PLoS ONE

Publication Date

6-2013

Document Type

Article

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0067600

Keywords

biostatistics, cross-sectional studies, epidemiology, immunity, infectious diseases, influenza, mathematics, medicine, public health, pulmonology, research article, statistics, vaccination, viral diseases

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

Introduction: Influenza vaccination rates are low in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A diagnostic breathing test in adults with COPD may increase vaccination rates; however, research has not demonstrated this relationship. The purpose of this research was to determine if adults with COPD diagnosed by a breathing test were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination during the past 12 months when compared to those with COPD diagnosed without a breathing test. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study using data from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Logistic regression examined the relationship between influenza vaccination among adults with COPD diagnosed with a breathing test (n = 13,201) compared to those diagnosed without a breathing test (n = 3,108), after controlling for all potential confounders. Results: Overall, 49% of respondents with COPD received an influenza vaccination within the past 12 months and 78% reported their COPD was diagnosed by a breathing test. The prevalence of influenza vaccination in the past 12 months was greater in those with COPD diagnosed by a breathing test (53%) compared to those diagnosed without a breathing test (36%). In adjusted analysis, adults with COPD who had a breathing test were 31% (confidence interval 1.1, 1.6) more likely to have received an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months compared to those without a breathing test. Discussion: A diagnostic breathing test for COPD was associated with increased likelihood of having had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months. This may be an indicator of the relationship between knowledge of lung function and the need for preventative care, a sign of quality healthcare, or good health-seeking behaviors in patients with COPD. This research is the first to use a nationally representative sample to suggest that spirometry diagnosis of COPD may increase rates of influenza vaccination.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.


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