Start Date

19-5-2012

Description

This paper examines the role archives and special collections (ASCs) play in information literacy instruction (IL) in academic libraries, and explores how ASCs can use primary resource instruction to improve existing IL instruction programs for undergraduate students. An examination of the literature indicates significant possibilities for undergraduate IL instruction by ASCs. Lacking assessment and a dearth in literature suggest future research is needed to determine how ASCs can provide IL instruction most efficiently and effectively. Existing studies primarily utilized qualitative designs to explore the perceived success of new and existing ASC IL endeavors. Future research will benefit from quantitative analysis of multiple ASCs that will produce more generalizable data. Additional research focuses on other non-traditional primary resource repositories which are also concerned with IL and its instruction. An interdisciplinary review examines theological schools and seminaries and museums as alternative disciplines publishing on IL instruction and invested in primary resources. The review indicates significant referencing of library and information studies within the literature from theological schools and museums which suggest cross-discipline cooperation could greatly improve research and practice. Overall trends indicate research on IL instruction and ASC is increasing. Though published research and reports provide examples of successful ASC IL instruction initiatives, additional research of initiatives using thorough and unbiased assessment of success is needed to determine how specific IL outcomes are achieved through ASC instruction.

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May 19th, 12:00 AM

Information Literacy Instruction and Archives & Special Collections: A Review of Literature, Methodology, and Cross-Disciplines

This paper examines the role archives and special collections (ASCs) play in information literacy instruction (IL) in academic libraries, and explores how ASCs can use primary resource instruction to improve existing IL instruction programs for undergraduate students. An examination of the literature indicates significant possibilities for undergraduate IL instruction by ASCs. Lacking assessment and a dearth in literature suggest future research is needed to determine how ASCs can provide IL instruction most efficiently and effectively. Existing studies primarily utilized qualitative designs to explore the perceived success of new and existing ASC IL endeavors. Future research will benefit from quantitative analysis of multiple ASCs that will produce more generalizable data. Additional research focuses on other non-traditional primary resource repositories which are also concerned with IL and its instruction. An interdisciplinary review examines theological schools and seminaries and museums as alternative disciplines publishing on IL instruction and invested in primary resources. The review indicates significant referencing of library and information studies within the literature from theological schools and museums which suggest cross-discipline cooperation could greatly improve research and practice. Overall trends indicate research on IL instruction and ASC is increasing. Though published research and reports provide examples of successful ASC IL instruction initiatives, additional research of initiatives using thorough and unbiased assessment of success is needed to determine how specific IL outcomes are achieved through ASC instruction.